American poetry

Poet and editor Matthew Zapruder says poetry doesn’t have to be so inaccessible.
The fact that nobody will buy, read, teach, or enjoy your poetry means that it’s the one thing that is totally yours.
Peter Neill is founder and director of the WORLD OCEAN Observatory, a web-based place of exchange for information and educational
Harold Bloom has called you profoundly original and a "hallucinatory force" as a poet. How did you feel when you first found out that he singled you out as one of his favorite contemporary poets?
James Richardson is most recently the author of By the Numbers, which was a finalist for the 2010 National Book Award, and During, just published, which won the Poetry Society of America's Castagnola Prize for best book-in-progress. He teaches at Princeton University.
"Someone asked me, "'Why do you write?' And I said, 'Because I wanted to tell people how I became this woman with razor blades between her teeth.'"
This year, in addition to introducing American poetry fans to five British poets to watch in 2016, I would like to introduce poetry lovers in the UK to five Americans worth knowing more about here in our own back garden.
The anxiety of the poet in the information age is to have one's work reduced to that cheapest of technological commodities -- "user-generated content."
Listen to poems by Anna Akhmatova set to music by Iris DeMent on the Poetry Foundation website. Poetry Off the Shelf is a
There is a rich context for this update of the now-standard anthology of postmodern American poetry, the one Paul Hoover first compiled in 1994, and which now, at nearly 1,000 pages, seeks to be the definitive reference for those seeking a comprehensive overview of the state of experimental American poetry.
You could drive Route 66 from coast to coast to get a feel for the poetry of America. Or you could pick up copies of Fericano and Wallace, and read these poems out loud.
Mark Strand, one of America's leading poets, has died at age 80. "Collected Poems: Mark Strand" was released this year and
With Compass, a debut collection awarded the 2013 T.S. Eliot Prize from Truman State University Press, Luc Phinney has burst onto and worked his way into the upper echelon of contemporary American poetry.
You should not read Annie Lanzillotto's L Is for Lion: An Italian Bronx Butch Freedom Memoir just to learn how to catch a
Would you like to understand Bob Dylan? Get in line. You can, however, understand, and appreciate more through his view of them, some of the writers who've had an influence on Dylan as an artist. Edgar Allan Poe, the fender-bender poet is a writer who matters to Dylan, and has for a long time.
Have they felt the hunger too? / it's an old emptiness under the rug, / the rumbling of dust / facing off to brawl for the blackened land. / Have they seen the faces with their hanging skin, the yellowed teeth, the sun-bleached earth?
Edgar Allan Poe: I wanted to do a parrot uttering 'never more' but there wasn't much drama in that. So I changed it to a raven. They're big, black dirty birds capable of anything.
Marilyn the Tortoise, was bequeathed to my brothers and me in '69 by our drug-dealing Cuban building superintendent who, running