Americans for the Arts

By James Tager, Manager for Free Expression Programs at PEN America For artists, writers, and scholars across the country
Metro Nashville Arts Commission and NowPlayingNashville.com host Artober Nashville, one of the South's single-largest cultural
Joe McGee, an affable jock, is the kind of handsome young man who feels that his only option is to follow in his father's
• Public support is coming, but not enough. We are seeing an increase in city government funding plans for the arts, and
While they differ vastly from one another, there is one common strength I have observed: the arts have made a profound impact on the health of each community.
Whether you're visiting Chicago for the first time or returning home, one thing is apparent: this is a city that values its creative sector.
As I reflect on the recent National Arts Advocacy Day and the several hundred visits to the offices of our Congressional representatives and senators that took place, I can think of hundreds of stories to tell.
Bassist/singer Kate Davis would be a multimillionaire if she had a dollar for every click on her collaboration with the online video project Postmodern Jukebox turning Meghan Trainor's megahit into a genre-bending stride-and-swing.
Do you enjoy the sleek look of your new iPhone? You can thank Steve Jobs for taking a calligraphy class at Reed College. Have you or your kids scribbled on a pair of Vans sneakers? Vans' President Kevin Bailey credits the brand's creativity with the arts education many of his employees have taken.
We try to organize class trips, and bemoan the increasing challenges of getting access to buses, to getting the OK to leave school for an arts experience when the pressures of sticking to curriculum and "teaching to the test" are ever-present.
To be honest, every month is an arts and humanities month, with 100,000 nonprofit arts organizations alone serving all of America. It's just that October is a month to boast a bit about our American arts and humanities treasures.
Public art is more than just an attractive decoration -- it is a conversation with the public, revealing a place's or a people's history, values and stories.
Our media-saturated society can no longer differentiate between validly earned fame and cheap or destructive notoriety, and it is well-known that susceptible individuals are inspired by the notoriety given mass killers via mass media.
Installation view: 20 elements, 2004-2005 Musée d’Orsay In anticipation of the gala on October 21, we spoke to Shapiro about
The arts can serve as both a model and catalyst for change for a number of the pressing societal challenges which face our nation. But it will require new ways of thinking and engaging with the opportunities and challenges of a more diverse, technologically-driven and entrepreneurial world.
As we enter into budget season, let us applaud the great elected officials who invest in the power of the arts, and hope that our elected officials realize that they are not "giving" money to the arts, or even just "appropriating."
The arts and culture, often without us actually even understanding or acknowledging it, are how we celebrate the great moments of our lives and how we inspire our nation's greatest deeds
Here at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, the role of the arts is alive and well.
Let's unite the 10 million people who work in nonprofits and countless millions who volunteer to push for an recovery agenda that utilizes the full array of our country's economic resources. Together, we can help each other.