an american in paris

Not everyone in the chorus dances--there are indeed some musicals (à la Fun Home) where almost no one dances--but I'm going
The house was bizarrely packed. Upon her entrance, Cusack received over a minute of entrance applause. Someone stood after
The bias may not be conscious, but it's very real -- and it's holding women back.
When Edward Norton thinks about a trip of a lifetime, visiting Campi ya Kanzi, the Maasai community-owned eco-lodge in the Chyulu Hills of Kenya holds a top spot on his bucket list.
It's well past 2 a.m. now and our eyes are glued to the news. We've closed the curtains and I shake every time we hear a car go by, thinking about the Mumbai hotel attacks in 2008 that killed more than 160 and wounded hundreds.
It's especially lovely when the dance community can gather together and applaud each other's efforts. Such is the environment at the Bessie's, dance's version of the Academy Awards or the Tony's. This year, the 31st-annual ceremony took place at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, with its iconic neon-red sign.
It is this simplicity that feels too safe in Kim Brandstrup's premiere for New York City Ballet. Jeux reminds you of Kurt Vonnegut's iconic line: "Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt."
The New York City Ballet has returned with all its relevance, strong and modern. The dancers are not "stingy." They are not "holding back." They exist in the "now," "right now." Balanchine would be proud.
What makes a show fail? Many in the industry have pondered that question. If we knew the answer, shows wouldn't fail. Even veteran producers with a string of hits sometimes stumble. For there is really no magic key.
After the telecast (discussed in my post here), Broadway is all about the after-parties. There is the official Tony Gala at the Plaza. Then each show or each lead producer usually hosts their own party.
It was a evening of stars at the 69th Annual TONY Awards last night, with some surprise wins -- rather, vindication for dedicated fans who were excited to see favorites win across categories. The little musical that could, which began at the Public Theater in SoHo and has now swept the TONY Awards just a year later.
This year, however, two things intrigue me: My kids' first-time stake in the proceedings, and Fun Home. Lea and Sara have seen a lot of Broadway theater this season. As a result, they feel personally invested in their Tony connection to You Can't Take It With You, On the Town, An American in Paris, Something Rotten!, The King and I. Each show is real to them.
Facing a crowd that included his mother and brother as well as Tony Danza, next up for a run at the Café Carlyle, Alan Cumming reminded everyone that he would be hosting the Tony Awards with Kristen Chenoweth on Sunday night, admitting that he was "freaking out."
If you ask me, On The Town, which is currently slightly trailing both other contenders in my Tony polling, deserves the win. I, like most, was worried when the show was announced for that barn of a theater, but director John Rando proved the doubters wrong.
Ivy Smith, however, is just another stock character - an ingénue-with-a-secret. There's another one of them in American in
An American in Paris is about many things: Paris after the war, the joy of new experiences, romance, love, dance and the relationship between three friends.
I've been away -- I mean psychically, mourning a friend; an employee at my bookstore who died very tragically two weeks ago. Her name was Cindi DiMarzo.
An intimate and honest new musical based on Alison Bechdel's best-selling graphic memoir. How does your family change as
A few weeks ago, I was invited to a charity lunch and in typical Mara fashion I started getting ready 30 minutes prior to the event. Panic ensued when I realized I had not one appropriate item of clothing to wear.