an american in paris

However anyone listening to The Ensemblist podcast was likely already loudly applauding for the ensemble before that podcast
I pay some lip service to being an ordinary theatergoer. I am truly a theater geek. On Twitter, I have a pinned tweet that
The bias may not be conscious, but it's very real -- and it's holding women back.
When Edward Norton thinks about a trip of a lifetime, visiting Campi ya Kanzi, the Maasai community-owned eco-lodge in the Chyulu Hills of Kenya holds a top spot on his bucket list.
It's well past 2 a.m. now and our eyes are glued to the news. We've closed the curtains and I shake every time we hear a car go by, thinking about the Mumbai hotel attacks in 2008 that killed more than 160 and wounded hundreds.
It's especially lovely when the dance community can gather together and applaud each other's efforts. Such is the environment at the Bessie's, dance's version of the Academy Awards or the Tony's. This year, the 31st-annual ceremony took place at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, with its iconic neon-red sign.
It is this simplicity that feels too safe in Kim Brandstrup's premiere for New York City Ballet. Jeux reminds you of Kurt Vonnegut's iconic line: "Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt."
The New York City Ballet has returned with all its relevance, strong and modern. The dancers are not "stingy." They are not "holding back." They exist in the "now," "right now." Balanchine would be proud.
What makes a show fail? Many in the industry have pondered that question. If we knew the answer, shows wouldn't fail. Even veteran producers with a string of hits sometimes stumble. For there is really no magic key.
After the telecast (discussed in my post here), Broadway is all about the after-parties. There is the official Tony Gala at the Plaza. Then each show or each lead producer usually hosts their own party.