anbar

So long as murder, torture and other human rights violations recur with impunity among Shiite forces operating in Sunni Iraqi provinces, there will be little reason to remain optimistic for the stability of Iraq.
BAGHDAD/ERBIL, Iraq, July 16 (Reuters) - As Iraqi forces prepare to try to recapture the city of Falluja, tens of thousands
June 29 marks the first anniversary of the proclamation of Islamic State (IS). It has been a busy year.
Defense Secretary Ashton Carter has complained that Iraqi National Army soldiers have demonstrated "no will to fight" against the Islamic State (IS); the fall of Ramadi was their fault. American soldiers attached to Iraqi units might be needed to "stiffen their spines."
While a strategy for peace in Iraq is still being formed, we already know one ingredient. Food will help write the peace in Iraq. For there cannot be any peace or stability with people starving and malnourished. We cannot abandon Iraqis in this time of great distress.
The 85-year-old Grand Ayatollah did not talk to me as if I'm Sunni or Shia, Muslim or non-Muslim but just as a human being. I left his reception fully confident that Iraq is currently in safe hands so long as it continues to have wise men like him. However, what will happen after Sistani departs a fragile Iraq?
"They told us they will go to bolster defenses on Ramadi's outskirts." "The dream won't last long, and soon we'll wake up
This is an unconventional warfare, hence the need for unconventional, ideological forces to adequately oppose this group.
"Their key focus is not Baiji; the prime target is Anbar," said Khazaal Hammad. "There is a big battle in Anbar, so IS is
Iraq's Sunnis won't fight ISIS for the U.S. says NIQASH, a non-profit media organization operating out of Berlin. Without Sunni support, America's war in Iraq cannot succeed. Here's why.