Ancel Keys

Ancel Keys, arguably the most influential nutrition scientist of the past half century or so, died in 2004 at the age of
The cottage industry in revisionist dietary history -- and make no mistake, it is an industry -- would have us believe that absurd misapplications of advice can be blamed on the advice itself. The dots, and decades, connecting Keys to Karelia, however, paint a very different picture.
Conventional wisdom is made to be challenged -- that, in fact, is what science is for. Science never rests, and those of us who profess devotion to it are obligated to move with it. But spitting convention in the eye is probably another matter.
As for those tweets, they can be painful. Many are ad hominem attacks, and each of them reverberates in its own insular echo
Rather, leaving aside the swirl of aspersions that likely has Dr. Keys turning in his grave if such things are possible, I simply want to note that his work is...moot. It doesn't matter whether Keys was all right, all wrong, or inevitably -- somewhere in between.
Perhaps it's an exaggeration to say our food glows in the dark, although I'm not entirely sure. But whether or not they actually phosphoresce, these products are indeed designed to glow. The glowing in question, however, occurs within the dark confines of our skulls.
The evidence continues to accrue -- with almost surprising frequency -- that we should, indeed, eat less meat, butter, and cheese (before we even factor in the environmental considerations, which frankly we should do). We just shouldn't replace them with donuts, Snackwells and soda.
Midway through the 20th century, heart disease caused one of every two deaths in the United States. While doctors traced the heart problems to clogged arteries, they didn't know what caused those clogs. It was exactly the kind of riddle Dr. Ancel Keys loved trying to solve.
A column entitled "The Questionable Link Between Saturated Fat and Heart Disease" appeared in the Wall Street Journal on Saturday. To spare you any guessing about where this is headed, I'll tell you right away: the column itself was pretty darn questionable.
If there's one number the health-conscious know, it's their cholesterol level.