andrew goodman

The incident inspired the film "Mississippi Burning," which wrongly concluded that the case was solved after an African American FBI agent was sent to Mississippi and interrogated a KKK sympathizer.
The street in New York commemorating the murdered civil rights workers is marred by giant signs that read "Trump Place."
While many things have changed over the past 52 years, much has not.
I grew up on Long Island, just a few miles from Patchogue, the town on the South Shore where Donald Trump spoke on Thursday. My parents moved out there in the 1970s, and my mother is still there. Plus, I work on the Island.
All were willing to step up to make a difference, to lead when it could be dangerous, and to let their lives be shining examples for others. We should remember them when we face stormy and cloudy weather in our national life and become bright rainbows of hope like them.
Last Saturday in Los Angeles, my friend of 50 years, Harry Belafonte, was awarded the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, an honorary Oscar. And yesterday, while we were savoring this good news, the White House announced that James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schewerner would be posthumous recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
June 21, 1964, went from a day of hope to a night of terror and fear as three civil rights workers from CORE were shot dead by a mob of Klansmen and law enforcement on the narrow Rock Cut Road outside Philadelphia, Mississippi, in sparsely populated Neshoba County.
Fifty years later it's time for another movement to demand a fairer and more just Mississippi and America and end the violence of poverty and illiteracy. Repeat after me: We, the people.
June 21st marked the fiftieth anniversary of the senseless slaughter and lynching of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner during Freedom Summer in Mississippi.
Fifty years later we must make a sacred pledge to honor this legacy by recommitting ourselves to those ideals that James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner lost their lives on behalf of all of us who are alive today.