Andrew McAfee

"The faster the world gets, the more you need to step back and appreciate everything that's old and slow."
We're entering the "age of entanglement."
John Maynard Keynes once famously said that the difficulty lies not so much in developing new ideas but in escaping from old ones. And one of the oldest and most pervasive and pernicious economic ideas is that technology kills jobs.
The movement away from old-fashioned jobs requires us to rethink workplace benefits.
Now that the Uberization of everything is breaking into mainstream politics, it's time to talk about what on-demand apps such as Uber or Pager will mean for transport, health care or other aspects of modern life and work.
We cannot take today's wealth for granted. Where there is no growth, there will be no wealth. This might sound obvious, but it is a truth we need to be reminded of, not only when it comes to distributing wealth but also when it comes to appreciating the roots of wealth.
Demographics and the anticipated rise of a middle class in developing economies do not seem to unlock much growth potential in the short term. Hence, we should not look for more of the same, but for what could be truly new.
There are some recent trends experts are sharing which show how this new world might look like, when the small percentage
LONDON -- Andrew McAfee, director of MIT’s Center for Digital Business, argued Thursday that technological advances of the
"The exponential improvement in the elements of computing is not about to run out of gas. We've got generations more of it to go. Geeks out there are going to take that computational power and that ocean of data and do things that astonish us."