angelina-jolie-breast-cancer

"So I personally insist my patients have psychological counseling. They all have to undergo genetic testing and in fact there
"I feel very, very close -- much closer -- to other women, and women who are going through the same thing. Wherever I go
In addition, the survey revealed that people incorrectly believe that if they don't have a family history of breast cancer
With more people talking about "Angelina Jolie Surgery," it's hard to ignore the parallels to Tommy John. How wonderful it is that, due to marvelous advances in medicine, so many patients "get to have" these operations and remain strong, beautiful and productive for many years to come.
Before long the gene for breast cancer may be associated with lower odds of contracting the disease thanks to the steps women with the now-dangerous alleles take to mitigate their risk. In the not-so-distant future, BRCA1 mutations may predict mastectomies, not breast cancer.
The two-time Grammy winner, 52, said she suffered from the same gene mutation that Jolie claimed to have, but that she would
HuffPost Fashion and Beauty Assistant Editor Michelle Persad joins HuffPost Live to discuss this week's worst dressed celebrities.
Angelina provides an interesting look into how the famous can drive conversations about health. She is a celebrity of status, and her story is both dramatic and complicated.
The tour marks the couple's first outing since Jolie's surprising and moving op-ed piece in the New York Times on May 14
On May 14, Jolie announced that she had been diagnosed with a mutated BRCA1 gene predisposing her to cancer. She revealed
Ms. Jolie's reasoning behind going through this process is the integrity of her family. Her mother's loss to cancer was deeply felt and she wishes to avoid this trauma for her own children. Her reasons were her own, and yours will be your own. But at least there is a plan.
Angelina Jolie has not granted any television interviews since revealing that she underwent a double mastectomy and now, it
Angelina Jolie's openness about her decision to undergo mastectomies because of the BRCA1 mutation can help inspire countless women to face this difficult decision. Yet several obstacles exist that deserve attention, concerning doctors and costs of testing.
Angelina Jolie, who has visited many war-torn areas in the world as a goodwill ambassador to bring peace, is now visiting our homes to invite us to learn about and discuss cancer and preventive care and is trying to raise awareness of this serious disease.
She was facing down the most frightening challenge of her life, but on Valentine's Day of this year, Angelina Jolie was focused
I admire Angelina for taking the unselfish view that she will do whatever it takes to be sure she will be around to parent her children. And I commend Angelina for making her decision public and thereby supporting other women who face an increased cancer risk.
I hope all of us use this news as an opportunity to encourage people to learn and ask questions about their own family cancer history and raise awareness that young women can and do get breast cancer.
I have been involved in research in this area for 17 years, since shortly after BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered, and I have no idea what I would do if I were a woman faced with this decision. The diagnosis of a mutation is just words on paper, but the risks they foreshadow are very real.
The fact that she made the announcement at all is significant. She could have kept her health issues private, just as she had done for the past several months. If and when the media learned of her surgery, she could have refused to comment.
Rachel Joy Horn joins Alicia to share her remarkably courageous story of undergoing a preventative double mastectomy at the young age of twenty-one.