anna karenina

Proving that one person's trash can certainly be a child's treasure.
On September 29th 2016 in Kiev, during an international Holocaust commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the infamous Babi-Yar massacres, Drubich's new Kaddish, an 11-minute long concerto.
I really perked up when the conversation turned to the notion of likability. Who says we have to like a character? Yet Franzen claims that "the safest thing" in writing fiction is not caring what the reader wants, in the sense of realizing, "Not everyone will like this guy."
The "hard problem" as you probably know is actually a phrase referring to the problem of accounting for consciousness. Most things are not conscious. This table we are sitting at isn't conscious. Vegetables aren't conscious. We are conscious, and nobody understands how we do that; physically, scientifically or metaphysically. Nobody really knows; and that's the "hard problem."
For a half a century, even the existence of Bletchley Park was classified. These days, we never seem to tire of films about
What Tolstoy does say is that Stiva's actions have destroyed his home's order -- "The Oblonsky home was all confusion" (as
I'm a newspaper book columnist -- was an English major! -- and yet shamefully realized last summer at age 31 that'd I'd never read "Anna Karenina."
Gloomy, claustrophobic and haunting, Richard Ayoade's second film, The Double, has been described by some as a dark comedy, a label that leaves Ayoade scratching his distinctive head.
"Ask a Russian, 'How are you?' and you will hear, for better or worse, the truth. A blunt pronouncement of dissatisfaction
Abdellatif Kechiche's Blue is the Warmest Color begins with a discussion of Marivaux's The Virtuous Orphan: Or, The Life
I'm often struck by the opening sentence of a novel or short story. It can draw me in and set expectations for what's to come. This isn't always true, of course, but a story's first line is the author's opening salvo.
Joshua Rothman writes in The New Yorker of his obsession with "Anna Karenina." Originally, he interpreted it as a love story
Grab a duck by its throat and ram down grain. If the goal is a fat liver--and death--ignore everything else, but everything
My mother had dementia. She would call me crying that she had no shoes. When I got to her apartment, it was strewn with shoes, but she was out somewhere, wandering, lost. Every time I forget something, I shudder, sure it's the first sign of dementia.
"The costume design in the film was reinterpreted,we didn't refer back to the novel for any costume details. We didn't take a direct interpretation from Tolstoy."