anne-marie slaughter

Is it possible for women to be, do and have it all? This debate will likely never end. At least not in my lifetime.
Here are seven books that changed the way I think about working relationships.
I know plenty of working dads who go away on boys' weekends. They don't feel badly about it. My wife makes time to be away with her friends. The biggest dilemma that presents the girls is finding a half marathon in a city with decent après-race shopping.
We are all stretched thin, "working" and "not-working." We each need to be able to institute boundaries around our time, so we can do that thing we're supposed to do -- have it all.
Working moms. If you ask Anne-Marie Slaughter, that's not really a thing any more. The thing is working parents. And how we, as a society, can do a better job in supporting them. Supporting us.
A recently released major study on women in the workplace shows that the gender gap continues to persist in corporate America, and for some heretofore unexplored reasons. Some of those nuances -- and many other gender issues -- were explored during a comprehensive discussion titled Women and Work at the 2015 Aspen Ideas Festival.
If you were to base your understanding of the corporate world on movies and advertising (as it can be tempting to do), you might think women were barreling up the ranks in business faster than you can say "next CEO." Sadly, for those who can bear to look reality squarely in the eye, it's clear that we're a long way from actual workplace equality.
Anne Marie Slaughter's article in yesterday's New York Times lays bare how women caregivers are shut out of careers because America's workplaces have been built around an ideal worker norm that assumed that any deviance from complete availability signaled a lack of commitment to the company.
Language both reflects and creates culture. It is a self-perpetuating system. If you can change the language you can alter the culture. The results are not always perfect. Stereotypes are hard to break down, but those who complain about political correctness are usually on the wrong side of the cultural shift.