antares

The photos come on the heels of a new report that tries to pinpoint the cause of the explosion.
There are moments in time when the coincidence of art and reality interact to allow us a glimpse into the context of history. The release of the Christopher Nolan film Interstellar a few days after two catastrophes in our space endeavor gives us one of those moments.
Perhaps we feel like we've already gone through the most difficult part of the learning curve when it comes to rocketry, and that now it's just a matter of perfecting a few minor technical issues. Judging by last week's twin failures, I'm not so sure that's true.
Usually, when a launch goes wrong just a few seconds after liftoff, the problem has something to do with an engine. Perhaps a fuel leak or a clogged fuel line.
Until we reach a large number of flights on a given system, we should be prepared for periodic failures -- far more than we would expect or tolerate with our cars and planes. And since we hope to put people atop many of these systems, we need to reach high flight count goals.
The Orbital Sciences Corporation (ORB) stock fell after the explosion. As of 6:45 p.m. the share price fell 5.86 points (-19.30
(Editing by Cynthia Osterman) Orbital Sciences made its first cargo run to the station in January. It has not yet announced
It is the second delay in three days for Antares' debut launch. A minor equipment glitch led Orbital officials to call off
Interestingly, Antares' initial cargo will include small satellites built by NASA from globally sourced smartphones. But Antares should also remind us that, when it comes to America's role in the connected global economy, we also need to act on some weighty issues here on Earth.
You shot yourself in the foot by calling them Space Shuttles. "Shuttles" don't boldly go where no man has gone before, they go to Chicago, and occasionally bring you from Parking Lot T to the front entrance of the State Fair.