Anton Chekhov

The meaning of the play is open to interpretation. I was wondering what the meaning of the show is for you? The play concerns
This works capitally well in Upton's adaptation, which he has transplanted to the era of the oligarchs in the mid '90s. Blanchett's
As all Hunter's characters gather In larger groups or in twos or threes, their foibles, worries and animosities are displayed
Thanks to smartphones, digital technology and social media, it has become nearly impossible for anyone who is online to avoid the tidal waves of narcissism coursing through cyberspace.
One of the hardest tasks for theatre companies is to find a way to make classics of the dramatic literature accessible to modern audiences.
Christopher Durang's Tony Award winning comedy, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, playing now through April 26 at the Cleveland Playhouse, is a delightful literary romp that keeps the audience laughing from the first scene until the curtain drops.
Perhaps theater has always been an idea whose best moment is yet to come. I mean, there must be something maddening about the year-in, year-out program model that regional theaters must bear in order to do their work.
If you go by Ivan Turgenev's A Month in the Country, revived at Classic Stage Company, you might conclude the revered Russian literary man was more of a city lover.
The "hard problem" as you probably know is actually a phrase referring to the problem of accounting for consciousness. Most things are not conscious. This table we are sitting at isn't conscious. Vegetables aren't conscious. We are conscious, and nobody understands how we do that; physically, scientifically or metaphysically. Nobody really knows; and that's the "hard problem."
It's theater that exults in the marriage of their talents and your imagination to create something special that needs no elaborate sets or frippery. The Chekhov is good (no small feat). The Austen is delightful and near masterful. And I will be certain to see whatever they do next.
Somewhere in Alejandro's Inarritu's Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) lurks a decent short story.
The very prolific Gurney is a cross between Anton Chekhov and Alan Ayckbourn. Like Chekhov, Gurney has a feel for both farce and tragedy and writes about characters trapped in what they don't realize is an expiring culture.
Curiously, one of the reasons the play falls short of Pulitzer Prize-winning Margulies's usual vaunted mark is that he's chosen, as many playwrights before him have, to make The Country House an homage to Chekhov. To be more specific, he's saluting--if you want to call it that--The Seagull and Uncle Vanya, and he goes seriously awry doing so, falling far short of Chekhov's dramaturgically and emotionally involving level
Charting the misery of his beloved Russia on the brink is Chekhov's artistry. He is adept at heartbreak, exposing the raw yearnings of those caught between desire and obligation. Broken people, broken relationships destroyed by inertia and indifference are his specialty.
The Pearl Theater's revival of Uncle Vanya illustrates this fine company's signature charm, and does one better, doing Anton Chekhov the good service of playing his tragicomedy for humor over gravitas.
Despite its short length, The Aftermath is a full and significant film, and although bare and minimalist in look, it's crowded with expectation. It is also groundbreaking, as I've endlessly mentioned before, the first film from Egypt to be included in the Cinéfondation.
I went to Russia to see if I could make a life for myself in a foreign land and language. I went to Russia to conquer my
If you're a fan of Mikhail Baryshnikov, or think you know your Chekhov from your Pushkin, Man in a Case might be your theatrical cup of tea.
Now should be the time when Secretary of State John Kerry and President Barack Obama aggressively propose confidence-building measures, not mete out more military muster. This will get us nowhere fast.
Marga Gomez is back at The Marsh with a new one-woman show (her 10th). Unlike previous monologues which were primarily autobiographical, Lovebirds is a beautifully written piece of fiction whose protagonist is a photographer named Polaroid Phillie.