Anton Chekhov

Your character is on a search for happiness and fulfillment throughout the play. What gives you fulfillment in your own life
Mikhail Platonov (Richard Roxburgh) is a somewhat worn and tattered woman-magnet; they are all after him over the course
Both Frances and Katie speak about feeling out of place. Laura Anson is ever the gracious host but also expresses dissatisfaction
Thanks to smartphones, digital technology and social media, it has become nearly impossible for anyone who is online to avoid the tidal waves of narcissism coursing through cyberspace.
One of the hardest tasks for theatre companies is to find a way to make classics of the dramatic literature accessible to modern audiences.
Christopher Durang's Tony Award winning comedy, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, playing now through April 26 at the Cleveland Playhouse, is a delightful literary romp that keeps the audience laughing from the first scene until the curtain drops.
Perhaps theater has always been an idea whose best moment is yet to come. I mean, there must be something maddening about the year-in, year-out program model that regional theaters must bear in order to do their work.
If you go by Ivan Turgenev's A Month in the Country, revived at Classic Stage Company, you might conclude the revered Russian literary man was more of a city lover.
The "hard problem" as you probably know is actually a phrase referring to the problem of accounting for consciousness. Most things are not conscious. This table we are sitting at isn't conscious. Vegetables aren't conscious. We are conscious, and nobody understands how we do that; physically, scientifically or metaphysically. Nobody really knows; and that's the "hard problem."
It's theater that exults in the marriage of their talents and your imagination to create something special that needs no elaborate sets or frippery. The Chekhov is good (no small feat). The Austen is delightful and near masterful. And I will be certain to see whatever they do next.