anwar ibrahim

When Obama meets Najib Razak at the ASEAN summit in California, it is time for a new direction in the U.S.-Malaysia relationship. Human rights should return to the fore. Obama must publicly demand the release of prisoners charged with politically motivated crimes. For him to remain silent is tantamount to giving Najib a license to act with impunity.
The country’s prime minister recently compared the LGBT community to terror group ISIS.
LONDON -- Malaysian authorities must ensure that this weekend's protest is not a repeat of the one in 2012 that resulted in protesters tear-gassed and arrested. The government has a duty to respect people's right to freedom of expression and to peacefully protest. A heavy-handed response by the authorities could sow the seeds of further resentment.
"The process is now complete and we call on all parties to respect the legal process and judgment ... Malaysia has an independent
In Malaysia's hotly contested political environment, there is little room for foreign dignitaries to meet with opposition figures.
Malaysia sits at a crossroads. The government has been widely criticized for a lack of perceived transparency, and although the legacy of semi-authoritarian rule remains strong, it's slowly changing in some fundamental ways.
It is extremely disturbing that the government of Malaysia -- by continuing to press this case beyond the bounds of reason, let alone the bounds of justice -- has used the courts to short-circuit the political process.
Malaysia's self-described "best democracy in the world" is looking increasingly tarnished these days, following the recent election and return to power of its long-ruling Barisan National party.
Malaysia's rapid economic growth may well be coming to an end, as natural resources are being depleted and the workforce has reached a limit of productivity.
Malaysians cast their ballots in the most important election in the nation's history on Sunday. On Election Day, as had been predicted by opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim, reports of electoral fraud were widespread.
If history is any guide, Malaysians have every reason to doubt that the Bumiputra system will be dismantled under BN rule. But the BN is swimming against the long-term tide. Our hope is that it does not view this win as a fresh mandate for more of the same, but rather, as a wake-up call.
Malaysia has in reality been a one party state for over 55 years with the ruling UMNO party winning a string of elections without much opposition. However, with the stellar rise of Anwar Ibrahim, the ruling party is facing its most tightly contested election in its history.
With an election in the near future, scheduled for May 5th, Malaysia's economy is under scrutiny. Is it really as good as the present government says it is in its campaign propaganda?
Prime Minister Najib Razak's government professes to be taking a lead in weeding out graft but the perception is growing that corruption under the Najib administration is flourishing.
Malaysia may not be in big trouble yet. While it still has a robust free press and whistleblowers are protected, the current issues have a chance to be addressed fairly. But the media is under pressure to conform and whistleblowers have been arrested instead of the corrupt officials.
Najib Razak presents himself as a reformer on a mission to modernize Malaysia. But the reality is that Malaysians want more than window dressing as the time gets closer to the next election.
The movement behind the Arab Spring has a different connotation in Southeast Asian countries where Burma for example, is slowly transitioning into democracy and Thailand and Pakistan are emerging from periods of military rule.
It is clear that the Anwar Ibrahim trial has been unfair from the start. Every day that it continues is a further blot on the Malaysian judiciary and, in turn, on that democracy.
It is true that most Western media have not taken the accusations against Anwar Ibrahim too seriously. There are three good reasons for this.