ap phone records

WASHINGTON -- A former top FBI official was sentenced to over three years in prison on Thursday for disclosing national security
Republicans in the Senate are abusing the filibuster to keep jobs -- in both the executive and judicial branches -- unfilled while sitting idly by and letting economic growth take a hit in the name of ideology.
The issue will likely evolve into how we define lies in our society. Is it a small-nosed Pinocchio? Is it a lie to save face
Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin's Twitter never fails to disappoint. She sent a curious tweet Friday taking up the issue of
If he weren't president today, Professor Obama would be up in arms over the actions of President Obama and his administration. In fact, he was up in arms over similar things involving the administration of President Bush.
Baker told HuffPost that “this is an issue that concerns all of us on the beat, and it's our job to ask probing and challenging
[Would you like to follow me on Twitter? Because why not?] Similar numbers are reported using the ongoing IRS inquiry and
I never contemplated or considered the possibility that the Department of Justice under President Obama would initiate an action that would blatantly violate and desecrate the principles enshrined in the First Amendment.
The government's actions likely have already succeeded in deterring government officials from confiding in journalists about national security matters. And that, of course, is the administration's real objective.
Those who bother to read these historical snippets will find many important departures and only tenuous parallels between the Obama Administration's IRS affair and Richard Nixon's Watergate-era IRS scandal.
The AP has openly questioned the legality of DOJ's actions, and civil liberties advocates have decried them as a violation
This week saw the kickoff of Second Term Scandal Season, though the first entrants fall on very different parts of the manufactured scandal vs. real scandal continuum. On the deeply-contrived end is Benghazi -- with supposedly damning White House emails having been altered by GOP leakers. On the actually scandalous end is the administration's snooping through the AP's phone records, which the New York Times called "an effort to frighten off whistle-blowers." The incident points out the hypocrisy of a White House that praises whistleblowers in the abstract, but then goes after them -- aggressively and often. "Speaking truth to power is now a criminal act," says whistleblower and former NSA executive Thomas Drake, who the DOJ charged under the WW I-era Espionage Act. It's President Obama's war against whistleblowers that is the true scandal.
“We’ve come full circle right back where we were 40 years ago, where the president is mesmerized by classified information
"The IRS reports to the Treasury Department, that reports to the president. The buck stops at the president's desk," Romney
Obama's Justice Department continued the Bush-era prosecution of Thomas Drake, a former NSA official who went to a reporter
Critics of the Justice Dept.'s subpoena of AP telephone records have shamelessly mischaracterized the Dept.'s actions and the purposes for them. Any interference with the free press merits close scrutiny, but that scrutiny needs to consider just what the Dept. actually has done and why.
(Jack Shafer is a Reuters columnist but his opinions are his own.) At the risk of making the Department of Justice's argument
Every U.S. president should visit a Blackjack table in Atlantic City sometime in the first term. It should happen just as they are in the middle of those Dreams From Your Ego, which promise bright new hopes if they can only win that second term.
I am a card-carrying member of the ACLU, a strong proponent of press freedom and a staunch believer in both a robust First Amendment and a vibrant Fourth Amendment. But I also care about rational public discourse, and the furious condemnation of the Department of Justice in this situation is way over the top.
“Americans of all political stripes were shocked to find out that the Department of Justice had been accessing telephone