apathy

The conversation wasn’t really that important, but it was fun.  We had gotten into the discussion of whether we should incorporate
When Reverend Scott Colglazier asked me to give a sermon during his sabbatical, I said: "Only if I don't have to speak from the pulpit, march in the processional or wear a robe."
In what The New York Times cited as "the worst voter turnout in 72 years," the 2014-midterm elections were an opus dedicated
"Empathy suffers from jet-lag -- it often wakes up only after it's no longer possible to do anything to help," said my father, a man who lost many relatives to the holocaust.
Sure, many of us may relate more to people in Paris or Brussels, but we are fundamentally no different than those in Kabul, Syria, or Turkey. There is a barrier that prevents us from this realization.
By understanding emotional barriers to action, we may be able to devise better guidelines for communication, advocacy and policy.
In the next few weeks, while you decide your New Year's Resolutions regarding your health, habits, and choices, add another to the one list, one that can impact every aspect of yourself, determine the opportunities you have, and govern the life you live. For 2016, resolve to vote, and to take advantage of your most powerful right as an American Citizen.
Much has been said about Generation Z-- today's tweens and teens -- and our endless selfies on Twitter, 6-second Vines and Snapchats. Though many demographers say this is the generation that will help bring better futures through our civic-mindedness, it's still common to hear that apathy among young people is creating a generation of passive bystanders.
There is an overwhelming assumption that kids don't care about politics. Yet, at the end of the day most people don't even give us a chance. They should just ask us a simple question: what do you believe in?
The mid-nineties were years that seemed politically engaged on the surface, but the general tenor of youth culture was apathetic and ironic, and middle class kids who had no reason beyond their youth to feel alienated copped a pose of bored disaffection.