apologize

Well, the first presidential debate is a done deal, and as always I like to quickly type out my own personal reactions before reading everyone else's, to give you an opinion uninfluenced by the herd mentality of the rest of the media.
“I’m sorry, okay?!” does not work.
Forgiveness is a process, not an event. It doesn't occur in a single moment, but rather over time, and often not as quickly as it did for Ashton. Perhaps if we were all more able to see the world through the eyes of a little child, it would.
I recently had the most fascinating consultation with a gentleman who was interested in the possibility of my representing him as his lawyer.
While elementary school taught me the importance of saying sorry for my mistakes, my experiences in college have shown me how to live life unapologetically.
Jane Fonda arrived in Maryland for a speaking engagement on Friday, but when she got there she quickly realized part of the crowd wasn’t there to listen.
Thankfully, your own faux pas may never happen on quite so international a stage. But since it's the holiday season -- full
Genuinely apologizing is one of the most magical healing, restorative gestures a person can make. Without the apology, there is no recognition or acknowledgement that mistakes have been made, there is no announcement that you intend to change, and most importantly, there is no emotional contract between you and the people you care about.
No one is perfect, and it can be a long battle back to regain the respect and the trust, but you can start by admitting you are wrong, saying you are sorry and apologizing to those you offended, or who were hurt by your actions. But act quickly.
Before you say you're sorry, stop doing the bad behavior. Trying to apologize while still doing the wrong thing is like trying to bail water out of your basement without fixing the leak.
If, on the other hand, you are sure that the other person really is the one who has created the problem, then here are some
Want to know the right way to apologize -- and the wrong way? Watch this interview I did recently, and I'll give you five simple steps to apologize correctly.
When we forgive others, we let go of our anger, resentment and bitterness, and we free ourselves of a great emotional burden that keeps us stuck in the past, in a perpetual state of perceived victimhood long after having been victimized.
Presently, it's Mitt Romney's turn. After a trouncing in headlines such as the New York Daily News' "Mitt Hits the Fan," over his tacit dismissal of 47 percent of the electorate as freeloaders, he's making the damage control rounds.
Today's Fearless Living Boot Camp video asks you to do something that will help you let go of the past. It's a must-do.
Refusing to say, "I'm sorry, I was wrong" leaves you powerless because you can't change anything. It alienates you from other people and keeps you trapped inside the conflict forever. But when you say, "I'm sorry, I was wrong," you give yourself the power to change.
Until now, I have not written about Whitney Houston, largely because so many others have. However, when I learned that Los Angeles radio hosts, John and Ken of KFI AM 640 had referred to Ms. Houston as a "crack ho", I could not remain silent.
The Wall Street Journal took a big swing at Romney in its pages Thursday, saying that because of his law Massachusetts is