apprenticeships

A relatively minor investment in retraining would allow the majority of coal workers to switch to solar-related positions.
President Donald J. Trump signs an executive order placing an emphasis on apprenticeships and vocational training, despite deep proposed cuts to the Department of Labor’s funding for training and employment services.
Many factors underpin the expanding income gap. Globalization has exposed low-skilled California workers to foreign competition
It's incredibly important to be educated as you almost don't stand a chance without it. However, it is important to accept and equally appreciate the fact that education can indeed come outside the walls of a university. Whether as an apprentice or an undergrad, we have great chances to excel in the fields we find ourselves. We must seize them. We owe ourselves that much.
Mexico might not pay for the Trump wall, but Mexicans most certainly will build it. The reason: There is a critical labor shortage in the United States of skilled craftsmen and women.
With business elites and political leaders from both parties decisively believing that the issue of income inequality and the erosion of the American middle class pose considerable threats, then the time is surely right to engage in the pursuit of workable solutions to those problems.
As a country, having enough people trained in the skills that apprenticeships provide could keep many jobs from going overseas. We should commit ourselves to apprenticeship programs. As one student said to me: "Apprenticeship was my golden ticket to the middle class."
And it's not just industry and economy who see a good business case. With the rising cost of traditional education pathways
As our nation celebrates "National Apprenticeship Week," it is worth noting that for over 100 years North America's Building Trades Unions and its signatory contractors have funded and operated a skilled craft apprenticeship system that is the envy of the world.
Nationwide, more than four out of ten adult American offenders return to prison within three years of their release. Too often, they return to a life of crime because they can't get a job, yet they can't get a job because of their prison record.
In his performance as a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination, to this point, Trump has demonstrated little of the knowledge or skills required of an apprentice. He appears to still be very much in the early stages of development and a learning mode when it comes to things governmental.
Volkswagen's experimental apprenticeship program pays workers as they learn and offers jobs to graduates.
If you're reading this and think that young adults should simply work their way through school with a summer job or forgo higher education entirely, know this: That is not how our economy works anymore.
The 114th Congress has an opportunity to fundamentally shift American life. To do so, though, they must overcome cynical calculations that have become too common when it comes to young people and politics.
Addressing the skills gap is vital to our economy, and small businesses are a big part of the solution. Small employers already support the steps needed to make a difference, such as apprenticeships, on-the-job training programs and more.
Apprenticeships are still sometimes seen as a novelty instrument and are also vastly underutilized. The reality is that apprenticeship models deserve far more respect. While they might be a little out of synch and disruptive, that is exactly what the system need.
While most mentoring organizations share these learning environment characteristics, we have profiled at least one for each to provide an example of how this framework is being currently practiced in the field.
This Labor Day, let's remember that hardworking men and women are the backbone of our country, and let's redouble our efforts to uphold our nation's great promise to them: that if you work hard and play by the rules, you can make it in America.
The Obama administration is now touting new programs to encourage apprenticeships. It has committed $2 billion to double apprenticeships (albeit from a low level) over the next four years. But these efforts will flounder if we do not rebalance our "mindset."