arab israeli conflict

Should President Trump fulfill his campaign promise to relocate the American embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, it would have major regional and international repercussions.
In Cairo nearly eight years ago, President Obama looked and sounded presidential. With elegance and grace, he expressed his vision of a future built on mutual respect between the United States and Arab and Muslim countries.
But where Hollande and various Americans agree in diagnosing the problem, France and much of Western Europe respond to it
The Israeli-Palestinian conflict has rarely been so far from finding a resolution. Since the cessation of hostilities between Israel and Hamas during the summer of 2014, the desire to seek peace has been diminishing.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's rhetoric and policies denying Palestinians freedom and equal rights have long buoyed some Israelis' anti-Palestinian hate.
The Middle East has witnessed tremendous unrest and tension in the recent years and the young business students at Harvard, who are organizing Sunday's conference, are very aware of the challenges of bringing people together.
Ronny Edry is an Israeli graphic designer and peace activist. A few years ago, he became fed up with the headlines and tension between Israel and Iran and decided to reach out to Iranians through his art, on social media. It was a simple message: "Iranians, we love you."
For many years, a two-state solution has been the default response to this wicked problem. But the spread of settlements, the disagreements over the status of Jerusalem, and the right of return for Palestinian refugees have all made a two-state solution a very unwieldy enterprise.
His surprise visit "reflects the sense of global alarm at the dangerous escalation in violence" there, he said.
An eye-catching exhibit during Banned Book Week 2015 resurrects the history of a 1983 book-banning in Tucson, AZ.
The bombshell announcement signals a desperate frustration with the status quo.
Dr. Imad Abu Kishek, the President of Al-Quds University, sat across from me as we celebrated Iftar, Ramadan's nightly break-fast meal. The table was full of students and faculty from Brandeis and Al-Quds, all of whom share a common goal: to reestablish the partnership between our schools.
July 8 marked the somber first anniversary of the start of the 2014 summer war in Gaza, when Israel and Palestinian militants
Prince Saud was a man committed to civilian rights and, as such, despondent in his final years, referring to a litany of
The old advertisement proclaimed that you don't have to be Jewish to love Levy's Jewish rye bread. Well, surely, you don't have to be a pro-Israel activist to be troubled by the grotesquely unjust treatment of Israel. All it takes is a capacity for moral outrage that things like this are happening today.
Forty-eight years ago this week, the Six-Day War broke out. While some wars fade into obscurity, this one remains as relevant today as in 1967. Many of its core issues remain unresolved and in the news.
Though "business as usual" is the path of least resistance on the Israeli-Arab and Israeli-Iranian axes, they are also risky enterprises as the old equilibriums shift.
Until there are Israeli and Palestinian leaders who can speak with the empathy and compassion of a Kennedy or a King and acknowledge the dignity and pain of the other, this struggle will continue to afflict both sides like an unending plague.
At no other time since the API was introduced in 2002 by Saudi Arabia has the development of events in the region converged to create a new environment, making the API more relevant than before; Israel must urgently adopt it as the basis for peace negotiations.