archbishop desmond tutu

Since the Vietnam War, our way of thinking has changed. More and more people now publicly oppose war; we saw this opposition to war in Kosovo, in Iraq. Many people were against these wars and, from Australia to America, people openly protested against these wars. This is truly a hopeful sign.
We, the elder generation, have created a lot of problems in the twentieth century. The generations of the twenty-first century will have to find the solutions for them.
The Nobel Peace Prize winner returned to the hospital being discharged last Wednesday.
Often we hear about another's tragedy, and it makes us feel better about our own situation. The recognition that we are all connected -- whether Tibetan Buddhists or Hui Muslims -- is the birth of empathy and compassion.
Although forced out of priesthood, Rev. Mpho Tutu Van Furth said she'll always choose love.
I would go as far as to say that forgiveness is the oil of personal relationships; in our most successful relationships we probably (unwittingly) do it many times a day. And just as with the bigger and more extreme stories on The Forgiveness Project website, forgiveness in daily life is an extraordinarily useful tool that has the ability to repair broken relationships.
In the wake of the shock of Paris, I had allowed myself to adopt and believe what I now realize is a lie I've been telling myself - that this is the best we, the world, which includes me personally, can do, and there is no way it can or will ever get better.
This account was compiled from an interview by ADST in 2009 with Monica Joyi, who worked for the TRC Media Office from 1996-1997.
Archbishop Desmond Tutu called the HIV/AIDS pandemic a "new apartheid" on a global scale. The virus works in a close alliance with poverty, ignorance, complacency, discrimination, and inequity. Its devastating impact is felt in every country--but especially in areas where inequality rules.
It's the third time the retired archbishop has been in the hospital in recent months.
South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu, one of the world's leading peace and justice advocates, has called Bryan Stevenson "America's Nelson Mandela." He has gotten innocent men off death row, successfully argued before the U.S. Supreme Court multiple times, including to ban "death sentences."
“The ultimate source of happiness is within us,” said the Dalai Lama in an announcement about the book partnership. “Not
This fall, I joined college presidents from around the country to plan ways to strengthen campus climate action and sustainability initiatives. Our institutions have a central role in preparing new generations to meet the challenges of climate change.
Bringing a country or a region out of conflict has taken leaders coming from the ground up, not leaders installed by a super power to serve its economic interests. There is one word today that such leaders seem to understand, repeat, and live by that seems to separate their successes from failures elsewhere. The word is inclusion.
Tutu called the summit a "decisive moment in the struggle to maintain God's Earth." But the UN alone can only do so much
When my community suggested I ask Archbishop Tutu and Mpho about how to resolve the Gaza crisis, I agreed. The resulting conversation is fantastic.
See photos from the Church of England's celebration here: Tutu, a member of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, called