Ariel Sharon

Some of the plots to kill the Palestinian Liberation Organization leader sound like action-movie scenes.
On that day, millions of Egyptians celebrated. It was time for us to break free from the cage of dictatorship, it seemed
The Netanyahu government's linking of national security to the so-called "defensive borders" is disingenuous and misleading, designed to provide a cover for his and his cabinet's continued intoxication with seizing Palestinian territories.
The occupation is not sustainable; it is costly both in blood and treasure, Israel's national security will remain at risk, and the country will become ever more internationally isolated while risking its very identity as a Jewish state.
On Tisha B'Av, Sunday, June 26, the former residents of Gush Katif are remembering -- in addition to the destruction of the Jewish Temples in Jerusalem -- the homes they were forced to leave behind 10 years ago in the southwestern edge of the Gaza Strip.
It carries big ramifications for American politics, the Middle East, and relations between the Islamic world and the West. Most everything will be more inflamed, not least the Iranian nuclear controversy and the future of Palestine. And of course American politics.
The incredible spectacle of Israeli Prime Minister Bibi Netanyahu's speech to Congress -- in which he appeared as much as the leader of the political opposition to the Obama administration as the head of government of an allied nation -- has come and gone but will reverberate for a long time.
Leave it to Netanyahu, however, to use the Gaza experience to justify the continuation of the occupation rather than working out airtight plans with the PA that would entail security measures to ensure that the West Bank does not become a staging ground for attacks on Israel.
I disagree with those who suggest that Netanyahu will never change his stripes. Many deeply ideological leaders before him have unexpectedly risen to the occasion to answer the call from their people and the international community for a drastic change.
The word 'Meretz' means energy in Hebrew, and Aloni's unique energy mobilized change in Israel on all human dimensions since its founding more than half a century ago.
The ongoing project of building a Jewish national homeland in the modern era owes a great debt both to Ariel Sharon and to Shulamit Aloni, and it can trace its roots all the way to this week's Torah portion.
On January 14th, Tom Friedman, while commemorating the death of Ariel Sharon, cited "a Hebrew biography of him [Sharon] entitled "He Doesn't Stop at Red Lights."" I beg to differ
Neither Netanyahu nor Abbas has demonstrated bold and visionary leadership, which is surely needed at this fateful juncture. The Israeli-Palestinian annals are saturated with self-denial and resistance to the inevitable, and there is little evidence that much has changed.
For some reason the passing of Ariel Sharon after the withdrawal from Gaza and the long years in a coma have taken away some of the bitterness that many felt about Ariel Sharon.
Gaza militants fired two rockets that hit an area close to the ranch where former Israeli prime minister Ariel Sharon was
For me, Ariel Sharon was a leader's leader who demonstrated the vision, courage and commitment to what he believed in -- qualities that are sorely lacking on the global stage today and especially in the Middle East.
Former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has passed away.
His death brings the Sharon legacy back into the forefront of the Israeli national consciousness and confronts the current Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, with an awkward dilemma.
Sharon moved from being a warrior to becoming a statesman. In both capacities, Sharon was thinking and acting on behalf of his beloved Israel. Sometimes this meant strength and toughness. Other times it meant creative non-military decision-making.
On Sunday, thousands gathered to pay their last respects to Israel's eleventh prime minister and brilliant military strategist, Ariel Sharon, who passed away on Saturday after spending the last eight years of his life in a coma following a stroke in 2006.