Armenians

The denial of the Armenian genocide matters. It matters that we do not formally recognize it.
"Hear the story of the Armenian people," Kim Kardashian urges.
Russia is not alone in flooding the Internet with fake news and “comments.” Post something on any reasonably large site saying
Foreign countries interested in condemning Armenian genocide should not only draw distinctions between Turkey and the actions of the Ottoman Empire. They should make the same distinction between Erdogan and the people of Turkey, who do not always support him.
And another hidden gem, a book written by Melkon's older brother, Harutune Jenanyan, detailed experiences and cultural accounts
When Azeri and Armenian forces started to fire at each other recently, it seemed that this exchange would enter the history of the decades-long conflict as just another of many routine violations of the ceasefire, which the parties to the Karabakh conflict clinched in 1994.
Is it easier to control a disease than a person? There are some diseases which don't respond to anything and simply progress along their deadly course. But most diseases respond to medicines.
Two weeks have passed since the legislative elections of June 7 marked a major shift in the recent history of Turkey. The Islamist Justice and Development Party (AKP in Turkish), headed by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, lost its parliamentary majority, declining to 258 out of 550 seats.
If you had to write a really brief elevator pitch for Eric Bogosian's riveting new historical memoir Operation Nemesis: The Assassination Plot that Avenged the Armenian Genocide, it might go something like this: John Le Carré meets James Bond meets Murder on the Orient Express.
We could start with a U.S. Resolution that recognizes the genocide, not only of the Armenians, but of the 3 million Christians under Ottoman and Kemalist rule, Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks who were slaughtered by various means between 1913 and 1923, which brought four millennia of Christian presence in Turkey to a cruel and bitter end in a matter of 10 short years.
There had always been only us: my mother, my father, my five sisters and four brothers, one uncle, an Armenian aunt -- probably with her own sad story to tell -- and their daughter who married and moved away too soon. Then a void.
A nation's refusal to come to grips with its past is more a sign of weakness, than of strength. Making peace with your past makes you stronger and more able to deal with future challenges. The inability to do so, is disturbing, to say the least. Denial and bullying the victim only delays the recognition that must ultimately come.
On Friday (April 24), Armenians worldwide will commemorate 100 years since almost 1.5 million of their ancestors died in
This transcendent sense of Jerusalem as our common Mother City, helping us face one another as siblings in the sacred family drama still unfolding in our own lives -- this faith-conviction is what can strengthen our hope for the healing of our world.
"Human beings tend to forgive and forget. That’s what is normal," he explained as his mother closed her eyes, sunlight pouring
"It is out of the question for there to be a stain, a shadow called 'genocide' on Turkey," he said at Ankara airport before