art criticism

Scientific workflow for discrete tonal measure analysis (Author provided) This article was originally published on The Conversation
Doesn't that sound fiendishly fun?! I've read several stories from a few editions. With titles ranging from 'Breaking the
The few events documented about her are steeped in Judaism. Her pregnancy forecasts the coming of the Jewish Messiah. In
I was intrigued when I read about a recent retrospective exhibition of "Voids" at the Pompidou Centre, where 9 empty rooms were devoted to 50 years of works of nothing, all by artists who had the same idea: That nothing is the best way to say something.
Dozens of other art writers, critics and bloggers have been writing about the Broad since it opened last week, and after having actually "seen" it, some have made prose of its alleged deficiencies.
As in, "Hey, what's with that piece of conceptual art. I don't get it. Like, I could do that."
There will always be a critic who dislikes an artist's work. But some artists throughout history have faced more than just one dissenting voice. These artists, now studied and revered, were once criticized, ridiculed and rejected.
Why one man's trashy art is another man's masterpiece.
Enough with the all-too familiar story line of Vincent van Gogh as the sun-crazed genius with those wild eyes and the fierce red beard and hair. That's the Hollywood version. But that is not the only, nor even the most interesting part of the artist's story.
I am spending some time in my hometown, Buenos Aires, giving a few talks and coaching local artists. None of the big names in the art world are here these days but at the Maison Rouge in Paris where a show called "My Buenos Aires" is taking place.