artbites

Sugar. Talk of it is everywhere. It's one of the leading causes of obesity and diabetes in our country. It is an ingredient so common to us that it is difficult to imagine a world without it.
Matisse lived during France's Belle Époque. Café culture was at its height, and cafés were where artists came together to exchange stories, discuss ground breaking artistic styles, and eat good food. This good food has a history.
This rustic eggplant dish is inspired by Archestratus and includes my latest ingredient obsession, anchovies.
A few months ago I was asked to develop a class around a group of stained glass windows at the J. Paul Getty Museum from the Canterbury Cathedral.
As I get ready to teach a series of English-themed classes inspired by the Queen Victoria and Photography exhibit at the J. Paul Getty Museum and Princely Traditions and Colonial Pursuits at LACMA, tea, scones and spices are on my mind.
Cooking and eating, like making love, stimulate smell, sight, taste, touch, and sound.
Beginning in the late sixteenth century wealthy young Englishmen, grounded in a thorough education in Greek and Latin, began taking tours through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization.
Though no stranger to French cuisine when he set sail, Thomas Jefferson's years spent in France completely revolutionized his culinary thinking and opened up a new gastronomic world for him.
Run to see Dining in the Aztec Empire for yourself, then head home to prepare a simple recipe inspired by the goddess of ripe maize, Chicomecoatl.
Let us pay homage to Leonardo da Vinci by preparing a roasted butternut squash dish.