Arthur Conan Doyle

The (very) loose adaptation of author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous characters comes out this Christmas.
I pull up to a small shed where I buy my weekly ticket; it's a gated community. In Lily Dale's narrow streets, I begin to
The TV production of Arthur & George is also well acted, with wonderful sets, locations, and photography, so enjoy it for what it is. Just go out and read the novel, too.
And if you're a Holmes fan, this book is probably a must in the canon. Dan Simmons delivers personal details about Holmes' upbringing you may not have read before. The author details Holmes' fascination with the new wonder drug from the Bayer company. No, not aspirin.
With his prolific works Richard Maxwell gives the inescapable impression that he finds the niceties of theatrical production -- things like scripting, acting, design -- compromising. The more well crafted they are, the more removed they are from holding up the mirror to true life.
We all need help maintaining our personal spiritual practice. We hope that these Daily Meditations, prayers and mindful awareness
Aol.Rise morning show 22nd edition airing live on February 24th, 2015. Today’s highlights, artist on the rise and morning tips to get your day started.
In Woman With a Gun, obsessed with finding answers, Stacey learns the woman in the photograph was suspected of having killed her millionaire husband on their wedding night, but the 10-year-old murder remains unsolved.
That's how Serial is supposed to get you: The feeling of true waiting -- something that is lost in our digital culture where all things are instantaneously present simultaneously -- is a novel sensation. Pardon the pun.
Kelley Armstrong has published twenty-one fantasy novels, thirteen of which have been part of her Women of the Otherworld series. Her novels blend suspense and the supernatural.
In the hands of Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes has reappeared, but this time as a manipulative intellectual lacking in empathy or warm feelings.
Politicians, warriors and self-important fools frequently fail to learn anything from the past. But for creative types, the past offers a wondrous portal which invites them to explore science and history (as well as the history of comparative religion, costume design, distant cultures and lots more).
A popular show business axiom insists that "Dying is easy, comedy is hard." While any performer who has bombed onstage will quickly acknowledge this bitter truth, the bottom line is that comedy depends on good ideas and solid execution.
Sherlock Holmes duels with himself on television. Two 'modern dress' productions are running simultaneously. Each has been successful critically as well as commercially: the English Sherlock and the American Elementary.
Steven Moffat, the creator of "Sherlock," told Radio Times at the Cheltenham Literature Festival: "We had to inform the BBC
I'm drawn to the idea of converting an old story into a modern context. If it's done well and done seamlessly, it proves something about its timelessness. BBC's Sherlock does this beautifully.
These house museums give us a sense of what life was like in a different period and a glimpse of what went into making artists, writers and great thinkers who they were.
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's first novel, The Narrative of John Smith, is to be published for the first time. Read more on BBC
The answer, Watson, is elementary. The reason Sherlock Holmes' latest adventure, The House of Silk, is only being published
The tales of Conan Doyle and White, told in alternating chapters, make up "The Sherlockian," Graham Moore's entertaining