article 50

Now the Brexit process has officially begun, the United Kingdom is looking to boost trade ties outside Europe. But any new business deals won’t be easy or fast.
In a setback to the UK Government, the British Supreme Court has ruled Parliament must first vote on whether Brexit negotiations with the EU can formally begin.
In a setback to the UK Government, the British Supreme Court has ruled Parliament must first vote on whether Brexit negotiations with the EU can formally begin.
The court ruled lawmakers must vote on triggering Article 50, needed for Britain to leave the bloc.
When Theresa May took to the stage at the Conservative party conference, the great hope was that she would finally move beyond the soundbite that Brexit means Brexit, and would provide the world with a glimpse of what Brexit actually means for her.
The overwhelming view from economists is that it is too early to know how Britain will cope with years of Brexit uncertainty - but there is a growing belief the country can avoid a recession.
Despite the media hysteria, today we can clearly see that the sky has not fallen. Just in the past few days, officials are indicating that the UK should not expect a Brexit to happen before 2020, as legal aspects of the vote are still unclear, and that there will be a government guarantee for funding toward in-process agricultural and scientific projects.
The Brexit referendum need not become a suicide pact. As a legal matter, the Brexit vote is not binding on Parliament, which will need to authorize and set the terms for the negotiation of Britain's exit from the EU under Article 50 process.
"It's best for the dust to settle over the summer and during that time for there to be informal negotiations with other states," the chief executive of the Vote Leave campaign said.