asking for a raise

As December approaches, thoughts turn to the office party, Secret Santa, treats in the company kitchen and, most of all, preparing for an extended break. However, for many professionals the thought of rehashing the past year at their end-of-the year review can be troubling and anxiety producing.
2016 will be here before you know it. Where did the year go? Anyway, if you are smart, you are likely already thinking ahead to what the next 12 months will look like.
The answers are within us. We have everything we need to create the lives we want. Getting clear is the starting point. An old Chinese proverb says, "The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. The second-best time is today."
I researched the typical salary for my position, consulted mentors and confidants, practiced my points countless times, and found inspiration and confidence from several influential businesswomen I admire. Here's what I learned from each of these inspirational women on asking for the salary you deserve...
If you're thinking about asking a raise, you may want to spend a few minutes pondering how you'll actually sound when you
Every New Year dreams are launched. Resolutions made. Goals are set. We spend time reflecting and wondering about what the future holds. Will we reach our goals? Will we know success? How can we improve and adjust?
If you ask for a raise, you have a pretty good chance of getting one.
How much money have you saved the department? What processes have you streamlined? How many people do you manage and train? When you're at the meeting, show, don't tell.
Comments like Nadella's show it's time for women to take action on their own behalf, whether seeking pay increases, promotions, or leadership roles.
Forty percent of Americans leave paid vacation days unused each year. That's not just bad for their tans -- now it's bad for their careers too. A new study shows those who take vacations are more likely to be promoted and get raises. Beach, anyone?
Sure, there are tables and stats and mountains of compensation data to draw upon. But really knowing your worth starts on the inside. If you don't believe you are worthy, how effective can you really be at negotiating for yourself?
I wish I could say that realizing my worth was a one-time event, but it wasn't. It's a journey. The fear never really goes away, but I'm learning how to manage it better.
Negotiating for a salary or promotion can be one of the most stressful parts of a career! However, it is essential you know how to ask for what you deserve.
Euler has a few pieces of advice for workers of both genders who plan to ask for more money: Realize you're not going to
Has it been more than 12 months since you received a salary increase? If so, you may be overdue for a raise. The average raise in base pay is expected to be 2.9% in 2014, according to survey results from Mercer.
And if it goes badly, take yourself out of the office before you get to this place, There's going to be a time when you want
One of the most important skills we learn as girls is the ability to ask without knowing the outcome: to apply for an opportunity we might not get, to raise our hand even if we don't know the right answer, to ask for what we want even if the answer will surely be no.
If you thought getting up the courage to ask for a meeting with your boss to talk salary was the hardest part, you were wrong
Hard work isn't all it's cracked up to be. Performance is only loosely tied to who succeeds.
Chances are that you accepted your current primary job with the initial salary offer. You were happy to get the job and you did not want to tick off your future manager so you accepted what was offered. You most likely are underpaid if that is what you did.