asking for help

I found myself exactly in my mother’s shoes and I had to learn the hard way that it’s impossible for one person to do it alone.
Image: "Which Way" by David Jewell. Used by permission. As we made our first attempts at saying what we needed, some other
I have always considered myself an independent person who is capable of doing multiple things at once and doesn't need anybody
About a month ago, I was out of town helping a cousin and her husband each of who were diagnosed with terminal illnesses
At a time when we're hyperconnected with each other only separated by 3.57 degrees, you would think it's easier for artists and creative people to leverage technology for their own practices. However, we're left unaided with misguided realities around who and how to build meaningful relationships with those around us.
The idea of being beholden with a karmic debt to anybody makes me feel less than someone who might have better access to a given resource. However, the act of giving makes room for receiving in turn.
Learning many more lessons in this vein, I finally discovered that being independent does not mean that I should have no help along the way. Even small doses of support can have a big impact. The secret to successful requests is to ask early and often.
Giving is an act of a generous heart and it also gives us a sense of control. Receiving can be really uncomfortable as it goes against the rules we have inside. We don't want to be seen as takers or as victims.
There is a finite amount of time in our days and lifetime -- it's up to us how we fill those days. It's up to us how we will manage our commitments. What will you keep, trash, or donate?
If you're in the same boat as me, please know that you don't have to suffer alone. Your mental health concerns are nothing to be ashamed of. Go to your GP. Tell them how you are feeling. If you walk away feeling embarrassed or ashamed or unsupported, it's time to find a new GP, because I promise, you don't need to feel alone in your suffering anymore.