aspartame

Aspartame may interfere with an important enzyme responsible for breaking down fat.
Another recent study, led by Eran Elinav, fed mice several commercially available sweeteners (saccharin - Sweet-n Low, sucralose
The pop is now sweetened with sucralose.
Aspartame lovers can stop hoarding Diet Pepsi now.  In April, PepsiCo announced that it was removing aspartame from Diet
Refined Sugar Ahh, refined sugar or commonly known as white (granulated) sugar, perhaps the most deadly ingredient on this
There is much we still don't understand about how artificial sweeteners may affect humans, but a growing body of research suggests turning to diet soda to feed a sugar craving may not be a good bet. A smart approach is to reduce consumption of sugar, fake or real.
This study shows quite nicely that non-caloric sweeteners can alter gut microbes in mice -- a change that has negative metabolic consequences -- and provides preliminary evidence that it can happen in humans too.
The question of what these sweeteners do to our body -- and by what mechanism -- is far from settled, but this study adds to the realization that looking just at calorie counts, without thinking a little more about the actual ingredients, might not be enough to lead to long-term weight control and health.
Public health and nutrition dialogues need clear, explicit messages. Naturally-occurring sugars and added sugars are very different animals. The same goes for processed foods. How is it that a national nutrition organization can simply choose not to recognize that cooking a pot of oatmeal is vastly different from making a Three Musketeers bar in a processing plant?
A new study in the journal Obesity, comparing diet soda to water for weight loss, has resulted in extensive and worldwide media coverage -- some of it, to my surprise, directly involving me. My involvement derives from my published opinions about diet soda and artificial sweeteners, which thus far remain unchanged after reading the study in question.
The first place to start if you have a chronic illness is to become intimately aware of what goes in you, on you and surrounds you. Awareness can bring about change.
The FDA could easily ban unnecessary ingredients like partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, mycoprotein, Red 3, and BHA. And it could set safe conditions of use on substances like sugar and salt. But the FDA has done nothing about, or has even defended, each of those unsavory substances.
Some foods have been promoted as "healthy" when they're exactly the opposite. Clean Plates founder Jared Koch shared nine examples. Here's an expansion on his observations.