aspirin

Even though vitamins, pain relievers and allergy pills are widely available, there's a limit to how much you should take on your own.
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is considering updating its guidance on taking a daily aspirin to prevent cardiovascular issues.
"As with any drug, patients and their doctors must balance the benefits and risks of aspirin."
As a pain management specialist, I field various questions about pain medications. What does the new NSAID warning mean? Is it OK to drink alcohol while I'm on Tylenol? Is OxyContin safe to take long-term? Well, I'm glad you asked.
Doctors may not always be well-informed about new therapies to treat medical conditions. Equally important, everyone may not know when to stop therapies, or not to recommend interventions that recent research show simply does not work as we once expected.
The bottom line is this: The idea of protecting the heart by simply popping a pill every day sounds a lot easier than changing your lifestyle. Keeping weight within a healthy range, eating right and getting regular exercise are great ways to maintain a healthy heart. If you have a history of heart disease, heart attack or stroke, daily aspirin may be right for you, but this isn't something to be taken lightly. Be smart and be safe. Talk to your doctor.