assad regime

Past rhetoric to prosecute previous US political leaders for violations of international law has largely been without consequence
Russia said on Thursday it would support a 48-hour ceasefire in Aleppo, a move the U.N. Syria envoy said would allow aid to reach besieged areas soon.
Since their days as medical school classmates, Bashar al-Assad and Zaher Sahloul have followed rather different paths: one became a war criminal; the other, a humanitarian advocate.
The CIJA smuggled over 600,000 pages of regime documents out of Syria. The evidence is damning.
The reality is that sometimes the trigger does need to be pulled. And pulled fast, too. With ISIS, Obama has been consistently late and light.
Getting all the key players in the same room for the first time, particularly Saudi Arabia and its arch-enemy Iran, constituted a considerable diplomatic shift in dynamics. However, getting all on the same page remains a colossal, but not insurmountable, challenge.
The challenge of Putin as well as ISIS requires an answer beyond avoidance and containment. The threat is immediate but also the challenge to the rule of law and the ideology upon which free and democratic states have prospered as societies and economies over the last few decades.
Blocking accountability and seeking to blame others for its crimes, even when premeditated is a KGB tactic, but only marginally successful. Putin should have learned the lesson that the truth is bound to come through.