assad syria

The present territory held by ISIS must revert to the state on whose territory it has operated. Yes, that means, for now, Syria's Assad regime.
Reuters was not able to verify the report of Islamic State flying jets in Syria or their destruction. U.S. Central Command
We have little to lose and much to gain in such a reverse in policy vis-à-vis Assad. If we persist on overthrowing him by force, we will perpetuate the disastrous status quo-- an anti-jihadi campaign that the administration has already acknowledged may be morphing into a new open-ended war for years to come -- all the while generating tens of thousands of new jihadis fighting new jihads that we cannot bomb out of existence.
Nothing better illustrates the bankruptcy of the Obama administration's foreign policy than funding groups that turn on the U.S. again and again, a neo-con fueled cycle of profits for war makers and destruction of ever-shifting "enemies."
Today Congress will vote on the McKeon Amendment, a piece of legislation most Americans haven't heard of. But the consequences of the vote today are grave: funding Syrian "rebels" will precipitate a new and wider war in the Middle East.
The Free Syrian Army, caught between the al-Assad air forces and the Islamic State group's territorial expansion, will benefit directly from an air campaign that is simultaneously against ISIS but does not allow any other air military activity.
Stepashin said they had also discussed economic cooperation between Syria and Russia, Itar-Tass reported. Sergei Stepashin
The president and his foreign policy team of advisers must now decide just what is the United States' foreign policy in Syria and throughout the Middle East: fostering the status quo and state sovereignty or regime changes based on OUR concepts of democracy?
To those who would slam Obama for bowing to public pressure on Syria, it's worth remembering that when George W. Bush was in the White House, public opinion didn't count for squat.
Syrian brigade and division commanders had been asking the Presidential Palace to allow them to use chemical weapons for
(CNN) -- Men sprawled on a tile floor, shirtless and convulsing. Children, too, seemingly unable to control their shaking
The civilized world cannot stand by while civilians are gassed; that's a given. But beyond any immediate, temporary retaliation, we all must be concerned with a settlement to a war that threatens to drag on for years more and further decimate Syria and its people.
A military strike on Assad could be disastrous and though we understand the dangers associated with inaction, expanding a civil war into an all-out war in the region seems too risky a cost.
Please, don't let the conflict in Syria be about opposing America. Let it be about Syria, and what might actually help Syrians -- you know, the actually existing people who are dying by the tens of thousands in this brutal war. But if you can't do that, then do me a favor, and please shut up.
That the Syrian regime used chemical weapons does not necessarily entail that the U.S. becomes the international judge, jury and executive to dole out punishments. Indeed, reprisals are subject to strict criteria.
Syria is not a disposable bride; it is not a prop to be married to larger ideological struggle. It is not a political mistress with whom one can vacation to these miserable battlefields for liberation and make selective observations.
It is literally beyond me to understand, with all this talk of "Miley Cyrus' ass" and "Are we turning a blind eye to massive human rights violations in Syria?' how there hasn't been even one mention of how you're planning to help me celebrate my birthday.
It seems almost surreal that Obama described the Syrian armed forces' alleged use of chemical weapons as a matter of "grave concern." I say "surreal" because the U.S. administration makes it seem as though it is the weapon of murder, rather than the act of murder itself, which matters.
The Syrian Revolution is not dead. It's alive and kicking but very different from the revolution of March 2011. It lives in the every breath, action, thought, in the every atom of the Syrians here. It is not a glorious revolution nor one that should be romanticized.
The current "wait and see" policy until a Syria resolution is reached will only exacerbate Lebanon's fragile position. This is why it is urgent that Lebanese, leaders and citizens, actively think of ways to shield Lebanon from the Syrian crisis.