astrobiology

The big question: Did they leave artifacts behind for us to find?
In the three-way horse race to prove that biology is not just a terrestrial aberration, there's one steed that many people ignore: sampling the air of distant planets to see if they contain the exhaust gases of life, or in the jargon of astrobiologists, biosignatures.
"We really do know that pretty much every star in the sky hosts at least one planet," says astronomer Adam Frank.
Scientists argue "early Armageddon" snuffs out alien life before it has a chance to evolve.
Just as MS DOS was a good operating system for the Intel x86, but even Bill Gates wouldn't use it now, our understanding of religion also needs to upgrade as human progress continues. But lets not just assume that "software upgrades" haven't already been taking place
With this discovery, we come ever closer to the idea that life is common in the universe. Perhaps you are not convinced. That is OK; let me speculate what would happen should we ever find evidence of life beyond earth even if you think such discovery unlikely.
Or, as Newsweek explained Simpson's argument, there are probably more planets with relatively small animals than planets
Astronomers have found complex organic molecules -- the chemical building blocks for life -- in the planet-forming disk of
Last month Russian scientists said they discovered sea plankton on the International Space Station that might be alive and thriving. NASA shed doubt on the discovery, and little has been said since. However, the German Aerospace Center recently responded to questions on the issue, confirming the discovery of "bacterial DNA" but casting doubt on other aspects of the Russian report.
I'd welcome an alien in my church pew any Sunday, as an astrobiologist who is also a pastor. However, none have shown up as yet.