Atomic

Just two months ago I visited Hiroshima for the first time. I met an atomic bomb survivor and we embraced as tomodachi. We called our moment, "The Hiroshima Hug."
Yo Miami is an artist collaborative / gallery housed in Little Haiti that is celebrating its fourth official year this weekend with a kick-ass birthday party Sunday afternoon.
August 15 was the end of World War II in Asia, 69 years ago, following the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. I could not find a single reference to the bombings, or to the end of the war itself, anywhere in the American media.
While occasionally throwing in flimsy references to the increasingly inflammatory ruling class/workers condition, the flamenco
The "strontium lattice" clock was created by researchers led by Dr. Jun Ye, a physicist with the National Institute of Standards
I know it's not always easy to grasp all the scientific gibberish and savant stories about particle acceleration, protons, matter/anti-matter, and the so-called "God particle" that we often read about in the press.
Alexander Kettler made an unusual find at his grandmother's home in Germany.
On this day, Truman informed the press, and the world, that America's war against fascism -- with victory over Germany already in hand -- had culminated in exploding a revolutionary new weapon over a Japanese target. From its very first words, the official narrative was built on a lie.
August 4, 1945: --Paul Tibbets, pilot of the lead plane, the Enola Gay, finally briefs others in the 509th Composite Group
Japanese cables and other message intercepted by the United States showed that they were still trying to enlist the Soviets' help in presenting surrender terms -- they would even send an envoy -- but were undecided on just what to propose.
July 31, 1945: The assembly of Little Boy is completed. It is ready for use the next day. But a typhoon approaching Japan will likely prevent launching an attack. Several days might be required for weather to clear.
July 30, 1945: Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, commander of U.S. troops in Europe, has visited President Truman in Germany, and would recall what happened in his memoir.
The second bomb -- the plutonium device -- was still back in the States. The target list, with Hiroshima as #1, remained in place, although it was being studied for the presence of POW camps holding Americans in the target sites.
A U.S. bombing raid on the small Japanese city of Aomori -- which had little military significance beyond being a transportation hub -- dropped 83,000 incendiaries and destroyed almost the entire city, killing at least 2,000 civilians.
July 27, 1945: Truman continued to meet with Allied leaders in Germany, as the Soviets got ready to declare war on Japan in early August. Preparations at Tinian in the Pacific to get the first A-bomb ready for use (weather permitting) with the city of Hiroshima remaining as #1 target.
In a 1946 letter to Stimson, Truman reminded him that he had ordered the bombs used against cities engaged "exclusively" in war work. Hiroshima and Nagasaki were far from being merely "military" targets.
A bizarre, and revealing, postscript to President Truman's involvement with The Beginning or the End was provided by Roman Bohnen, the actor who portrayed Truman in the original sequences.
My fascination with the making and unmaking of the MGM film took me to the Truman Library, where I was the first to consult key documents.
The new view was produced with a novel nano-imaging technique, developed by researchers at UCLA and Northwestern, that allows
The researchers say their so-called nuclear clock would be accurate to 19 decimal places. While such precision might be overkill