authors guild

The Supreme Court's recent decision to deny review of the Authors Guild v. Google, Inc. ruling was a blow not just to the suit's plaintiffs in the book industry but to all of us in the business of writing and publishing content.
Who amongst you has not anteed up for a book from Amazon? Admit it, even those of you who dream of publishing your own book have spent money at Amazon buying e-books or printed books for less than any competitor could afford to sell them.
The Authors Guild had claimed that the effort violated copyright law.
In the end, what continues to rise up in the debate -- and what Amazon seemingly continues to ignore -- is the fact that books are different from the myriad other products that Amazon sells.
Congress, for the first time since 1976, is reviewing and rewriting copyright law and doing so within the context of the Internet and the digital distribution of creative works. The stakes couldn't be higher for the creative community.
There's an old saying that "knowledge is power." However, long before anyone had written up a job description for an "intellectual property" lawyer, people were battling over who should and should not have access to knowledge.
The organizations argue that allowing Amazon to have such domain addresses that end in suffixes such as ".book," ".author
In March 2001, Judge Denny Chin rejected a $125 million settlement of the lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, saying
It was a glittering dream: A vast worldwide digital library, tens of millions of books all in one easily accessible place
Judge Denny Chin’s opinion in rejecting the settlement between Google and the authors and publishers who sued it for infringement