automakers

The United Auto Workers union is leading its first strike against General Motors in 12 years, in a fight over jobs and benefits.
Governments and business can no longer conceal the death toll, and publics are unwilling to tolerate it. Governments are acting. The VW settlement is not the only regulatory crackdown on internal combustion engines.
There's an inherent beauty in the way an automobile works. It's like the ultimate exercise in teamwork. The rapid succession of small explosions taking place under the hood, combined with speed and the required safety equipment, shouldn't add up to a pleasant experience, but it does.
What these automakers understand, however, is that beyond these consumers being men, they're fathers. These automakers understand the growing influence of the fatherhood role on today's man and how powerful that identify has become.
You can count on the semi-annual Geneva auto show to bring out the most outrageous pieces of automotive design. In the heart of Europe, the show is a magnet for high-end manufacturers and well-heeled car enthusiasts looking for their next conspicuous ride.
I was stuck in traffic yesterday, which I didn't really mind because I have a fun little yellow convertible, and I was thinking
Two years ago today, a little-noticed, but profoundly important, trade agreement between the United States and South Korea took effect.
The EPA, we are told, will unveil this week new regulations to remove sulfur from American gasoline blends. Rather than representing some radical move of aggressive government intervention, this action will only just bring the United States up to the existing standards of Europe, Japan and South Korea.
I met Ernie at his sprawling estate in Massachusetts, literally just minutes from his auto empire. The large brick estate
By today's standards my political views are considered liberal, perhaps even far to the left of center. Yet just a few decades ago I would have been (and was) labeled a moderate or even slightly right of center for holding the same positions I hold today.
It looks like the saga of the electric vehicle, which began way back in the 1830s, has a way to go. Let's take a look at what might be ahead.
The scene around my Connecticut home is not pretty, with downed trees and power lines everywhere. It's a serious time, and a time for some serious questions. Why did this happen?
Ten years ago, who would have thought that space exploration could be pioneered by a small upstart team and an energy drink company? This might be the most vivid sign yet that the game is about to change.
Tuesday night's exchanges on energy between President Obama and Governor Romney never touched on that point -- but its oddly crucial in understanding the Romney "energy independence for North America" plan.
But in the process of adjusting the car to fit American standards, the Nano will end up losing its incredibly cheap price
GM's quandary is how to increase sales volume so that it can spread its estimated $1.2-billion investment in the Volt over
How many single drivers pull up for lattes in all-terrain, heavy-duty SUVs made for eight people? Slick marketing may have made gas-guzzlers sexy, but the situation was exacerbated by years of mileage rules that favored SUVs and trucks, creating what's known as the SUV loophole.
Today ushers in a new era for American drivers. Soon we will save thousands of dollars every year at the gas pump. Car buyers will be able to choose from hundreds of models that combine fuel-efficiency, high performance and safety. And workers will find half a million new jobs building the cars of future.