automatic voter registration

Automatically registering voters instead of having them choose to register could have huge consequences.
In Oregon, voters are steadily being added to the rolls because of a pioneering process.
Vermont tried it and saw a big increase in registered voters -- and it's not even an election year.
With the United States' voter registration rate among the lowest in the developed world, there's no doubt we need a National Voter Registration Day. But, if our country wants to work towards a goal of getting more Americans to vote, we also need a Voting Restoration Day.
Yesterday Governor Chris Christie vetoed an automatic voter registration bill that would have put New Jersey at the vanguard of the national movement to modernize voter registration, facilitating access to voting for nearly half a million eligible but unregistered New Jersey citizens.
I conducted the following interview yesterday, before the convention actually started. Denise Merrill is a Connecticut delegate (although not, as she pointed out to me, a superdelegate) and serves Connecticut as their Secretary of State. A recent achievement was the state becoming the first to pass a campaign finance reform law which created a public financing system for elections -- all the other states with such laws created them through ballot initiatives or referenda.
Congressional Democrats propose making it easier to vote, not harder.
Boy, it isn't every day you get to write a headline like that! But those are the kinds of feelings Ted Cruz seems to bring out in everyone -- left, right, and center.
West Virginia became the third state in the nation to pass an automatic voter registration law, following Oregon and California.