B-52

The annals of aviation are replete with near-miraculous stories of survival. There is, of course, Capt. Chesley Sullenberger
"Whoops" is not a word that you want to hear around the most destructive weapons on earth. Unfortunately it happens more often than you would like to think.
He believed the B-47 Stratojet was the most elegant machine he'd ever seen and insisted it was the crown jewel of the jet age. His fearless acrobatics trained the large jet to toss a nuclear bomb, and he logged more hours flying that swept-wing wonder than any other Boeing test pilot.
Perhaps we need 50 or even 100 nuclear weapons. To be safe, perhaps we keep an active stockpile of 450 nuclear weapons, as nuclear experts recommended in a 2012 study. We have 5,000 today.
He is quick to add, "The president can be reassured -- nuclear deterrence will still happen, conventional operations will
2011-04-15-bombpong.jpgBomb Ponds examines the remains of America's secret 2,756,941-ton bombing campaign in Cambodia during the Vietnam War.
Hiroshima and Fukushima are of course very different, but the tragedies are fundamentally connected. Both involve our collective deception that we can always control the nuclear machines we invented. We cannot.