baathists

A new video obtained by NBC News claims to show the raid on an ISIS prison that killed one American soldier and rescued 69
In recent years I have worked deeply on quiet conflict management interventions from Afghanistan to Iran, but mostly in Syria. I have watched the unnecessary suffering of countless people, the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of Syrians, the greatest civilian displacement in Middle Eastern history, and I have watched it up close through the lives of my students and friends.
The Islamic State's extremism, however, is now causing rifts in the alliance, with Baathist and Islamic State fighters competing
Americans should ignore these Sirens of Death. Attempting to forcibly transform Iraq never was Washington's responsibility. Having botched the job once, U.S. policymakers should not try again. There certainly is no public support for new military adventures in Mesopotamia.
Eventually, Assad or his sons must renounce power; history teaches that no repressive regime lasts forever. But how long until this family falls? How long until "might makes right" is replaced by morality, until the pen and law and human decency really do triumph over the sword?
This is a crisis that cannot be understated. The post-election period reveals that no election result is safe from court intervention and constitutional brigandry in the new Iraq.
As Barack Obama goes about forming a cabinet, cries have gone up that Obama is committing some kind of sin by appointing a number of people who worked in the Clinton Administration.
Obama's refusal to criticize the U.S. attack on Syria raises the prospect that rather than pursue the diplomatic route, he will instead "pick up where the Bush Administration has now ended."
Maj. Gen. Hussein al-Awadi, a former official in Saddam Hussein's Baath Party, became the commander of the Iraqi National