baby naming

Dylan, Bowie, Axel and more.
Playwright Wajahat Ali said Muslim parents worry about burdening their child with a traditionally Muslim name.
Why, oh, why, must our significant others feel like they should have a say in the name of our children? Don't they know that most women have names picked out long before they even date, much less get married? It goes hand-in-hand with planning our weddings.
You're in charge of what this person will be called for the rest of his/her life. And you have literally thousands of choices in hundreds of baby-naming books. It's a lot of pressure.
In the delivery room, I was dressed in my scrubs just like in the movies. My seat was next to my love, who was on the operating table, arms stretched out. There was a screen cloth right above her sternum obscuring her nether region. Her face was glowing in the halo of the operating lights.
What to call the whole deal? I mean "sets" of quadruplets, "sets" of quintuplets and so forth seems to miss the grandeur of the moment, and the challenge ahead for the parents of such miracles.
Some unusual names can actually work -- and might be enjoyed. And, more importantly, it shouldn't matter what your name is. Or how you look, or where you're from, or your sexual orientation or whether you have disabilities. We are each as worthy as anyone else -- and deserving of respect and kindness.
Ethan Andrew is the name of the patron saint of Scotland, Russia, and its native Greece -- and so a good choice if you have
Beware of what I call the "Name Fad." Sure, it sounds hip now, but in 30 years, the names Natalie, Chelsea, Samantha, and Lindsay will sound how Nancy, Cheryl, Susan, and Linda do today. And in 60 years, the names Ethan, Cody, Brandon, and Matthew will be Earl, Chester, Bernard, and Melvin. These are all just Name Fads -- only difference is when they happened.
Naming a child in any religious tradition is a momentous occasion. In recent decades, in the Jewish tradition, one can combine traditional Jewish ceremonies and contemporary Jewish customs in a personal, familial and communal way which perpetuate the values and ideals which we cherish.
Do you find yourself discussing celebrity baby names more these days? Do you notice more articles about the top names of the year, or hear more friends agonizing over whether Amelia and Atticus have become "too popular"?
Does her name work because it's perfect for her, or because we have started to associate certain personality characteristics with it?
Today is Donald Duck's birthday, so we thought we'd commemorate it by inviting a bunch of his oldest chums over to Nameberry to celebrate.
A few weeks ago we asked the Nameberry moms and dads to tell us their best baby-names rules. What followed were hundreds of suggestions, from the idiosyncratically individual (all middle names must be Celtic and begin with R) to rules so universal they might apply to everyone.
Another website, yourbabydomainname.com, a U.S. based site, conducted a very similar survey in October 2011, which resulted
What we name our children speaks a lot more about where we are emotionally at the time than where they may be headed in the future, and therein lies the problem.
So, what’s a parent to do in this situation? In 2008, we heard about a Cleveland couple who actually changed their daughter’s
Pamela Redmond Satran and Linda Rosenkrantz are founders of Nameberry.com and innovators of baby-name content on the Web