bad bosses

Be careful. Is your bad manager a rescuer, a people-pleaser or a numbers person?
A secret audio recording can be key to proving harassment or discrimination – if it's done legally.
Don't be fooled by "Everything is fine" and "Don't you agree?"
When it comes to behavior and emotions, employees consciously and subconsciously take cues from their leaders.
But before you throw your hands up just because your boss is degrading, condescending, a micro-manager, a yeller, a passive aggressive lamebrain or, simply a bully, there are strategies you can employ that will help you preserve your sanity. Consider these tactics before you bolt for the door.
I dread getting my annual judgement handed down to me. I am instantly transported back to the age where naps were part of school and when my favorite activity was building walls and knocking them down with my boyfriend, Clarence.
This may feel as if I've asked you to suck on a lemon, but find a way, anyway, that you can to feel better about your boss. Go on... I challenge you, even though I know you're kicking and screaming with resistance, and you're about to delete this post.
Whether you are applying for a campus job, an internship, or a post-college full-time position, you are interviewing a potential employer as much as they are interviewing you.
People crave good leadership, and when it doesn't measure up, good employees leave and companies lose lots of money and valuable talent.
I recently read an article in The Wall Street Journal entitled "The Workplace Evolves From Sunbeam's 'Chainsaw Al' to Netflix's No-Jerk Rule." It started on an excellent foot by using the verb "evolve." Then it progressed into an un-evolved series of questions and statements.