baher mohamed

The president pardoned three Al Jazeera journalists who had been sentenced to three years in prison in Egypt because of their journalism. The trial was characterized by The New York Times as a "kangaroo court."
The move comes a day before Sissi is slated to attend the annual U.N. summit of world leaders.
For the sake of the Al Jazeera journalists and media freedom in Egypt at large, Amnesty International is working to resuscitate the lifeline between the truth and truth seekers.
Baher received an additional six months in prison. The state news agency MENA said that extra time was handed down because
My clock is ticking. Time is close. Come judgment day, I dread becoming another statistic languishing behind bars, referred to by a hashtag on Twitter knowing that the outcome of the trial may have nothing to do with evidence but merely based on the political score settling between Qatar and Egypt. It will be much harder this time around to get locked up for a crime I didn't commit after tasting freedom.
A third Al Jazeera journalist, Australian Peter Greste, was deported in February. The journalists are charged with aiding
After a series of high-level meetings to discuss press freedom concerns with Egyptian officials in Cairo earlier this month, it was heartening to hear that journalists Mohamed Fadel Fahmy and Baher Mohamed had been granted bail.
How, in the modern age, can a state put on such sham proceedings, open to the world, and get away with it?
The images from Egypt, of journalists in cages, should make all of us recoil and react. And stand firm in our commitment to protecting the freedom of the press.
The Obama administration's statements about the three Al Jazeera journalists are encouraging and ring true to the needs of both the Egyptian and the American people, but it's unsure whether they are in the right position to point their finger just yet.
Egypt's sentencing of three Al Jazeera journalists to prison on terrorism-related charges was met with international condemnation