Baltics

At a joint press conference with leaders of the Baltic states, President Donald Trump ordered the president of Latvia not to pick a reporter from the United States, once again calling them “fake news.”
Now that President Donald J Trump has been sworn in, it is time to clear the air concerning Russia. It will take an effort
When I revisited Vietnam in recent years, after reporting from the region during the 1970s, I noted how its rulers had won their wars against France and the United States only to lose out on the economic front, as Communism put them a quarter century behind the roaring "tigers" of East Asia. Now they are struggling to catch up by offering their cheap labor to international investors.
Tunes, traditions, styles, perspectives -- one might think of us as the carriers of a DNA that can both stubbornly endure and spontaneously mutate as we meet other musicians and enter new realms.
Trump, NATO and the Baltics - heed the hard-earned lessons. By: Joergen Oerstroem Moeller. For the third time since 1945
Not fast enough, some experts say, even as Vladimir Putin probes its defenses.
NATO expansion was considered a great success. But now the alliance realizes that it is obligated to war against nuclear-armed Russia on behalf of three essentially indefensible countries.
What would Russia gain from attacking the Baltics? A recalcitrant, majority non-ethnic Russian population. A possible temporary nationalist surge at home. A likely short-lived victory over the West. The costs would be far greater.
Much is said these days about the mismatch of missions and resources for the military. Indeed, the chants of neoconservatives on Capitol Hill have gotten quite loud: more military spending, more personnel, more weapons.
Montenegro neither threatens nor is threatened by anyone. Adding it to NATO is like accumulating Facebook Friends. They do little more than allow preening Washington officials to wander the globe gloating how popular the U.S. is.