banjo

There is an ongoing debate in the online special needs community about over-sharing. Are we mom and dad bloggers stepping over the line when we share stories and details about our kids and their special needs? It's a heated debate, a thing, a downright brouhaha.
With two voices or instruments, it's easier to hear what each is doing separately as well as the sum total: melodies and countermelodies, synchronic and diachronic, horizontal and vertical. Which is all to say, some pretty cool duo recordings have crossed under my lintel of late.
A few years ago, Ben, our son with severe autism, got a chance to meet one of his favorite musicians -- or more accurately, meet the man responsible for creating some of his favorite music. We now know there's a big difference, and this "meeting" helped us understand our big guy a little better.
But seriously, if there's a time to use the word Americana, it's got to be July 4th, right? So here are some genre-bending releases that fit the name.
Banjo legends (and married couple) Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn concocted this surprisingly charming cover of "The Final
The group's challenge was familiar to anyone in traditional music: interpret source recordings in an interesting way while remaining true to the spirit of the originals.
Listen to those harmonies. In the video above, banjo player Allan Anderson shows off his skills while his beagle sings right
Who knew banjos could be so hardcore? In the video above, Rob Scallon crushes heavy metal band Slayer's hit song "Raining
DeAngelis is a technology and supply chain entrepreneur and patent holder with more than 25 years of experience in building
The wheel of time turns, a year goes by, and once again I'm writing about CDs that people put into my hands at the annual
The Plum Magnetic's most recent record, Terra Animata, sounds larger than their four members. Infusing sonic sounds of classical Hindustani with American roots music, their vibe has a calming effect. They have weaved a tapestry together of classical tracks.
Baby Uzi has already learned one of life's most important lessons: when you hear banjo music, you bounce. Understandably
Amid the Dixon Place bar's clinking drinks and humming, intimate assembly, bandleader Leah Wells glows with anticipation. The versatile musician plays guitar, mandolin, banjo, and fiddle in several bands around New York.
In the United States and around the world, roots music is thriving. You can see it at the highest levels of the global music scene, in the work of Grammy-winning artists such as the Carolina Chocolate Drops and the Chieftains, both of which have new albums very much worth hearing.
Now that Facebook is a public company (or will be by the end of the week) and will be making regular appearances on channels
There's a current resurgence in interest in the banjo by today's popular musicians (i.e. Mumford & Sons, The Avett Brothers and Taylor Swift). Those new folks may come and go, but a true obsession runs very deep. For at least one lifetime.
At a recent show, guitarist Hubby Jenkins joked that a white person playing banjo in the mid-1800s was like "Vanilla Ice rapping in the 1980s."