bank fraud

Todd and Julie Chrisley have been indicted on multiple counts of conspiracy, bank fraud, wire fraud and tax evasion.
Much like with drug kingpin El Chapo, prosecutors are seeking a criminal forfeiture of his assets.
He submitted "doctored profit statements" for mortgage to secure bail, say prosecutors.
Roboff and Jones have identified a key concern though; that the regulatory community and the financial services industry
Here are three things anyone wanting to hold Wells Fargo accountable needs to know.
Last week I shared a letter I had to written to Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf in March of 2013, regarding the intense sales culture and the negative impact it had on employees, including my sister, who was about to lose her job because she could not meet her sales goals. In that letter, I quoted to him Wells Fargo's Vision Statement:
The reality star's robbery came up during oral arguments in a bank fraud case.
It comes as no surprise to me that employees at Wells Fargo resorted to dishonesty in opening bogus accounts, just to keep their jobs. Why am I not surprised? Because in 2013, after six years of employment, my sister was about to lose her job at Wells Fargo due to sales goals.
Banks profit from low wages and job insecurity in more ways than the obvious. They don't just pocket the wage differential; they use the poverty-level wages and job insecurity to force employees to do unethical things they couldn't otherwise get them to do.
Millennials aren't incredibly worried about bank fraud -- but they should be. According to a 2014 Federal Trade Commission study, 20- to 29-year-olds are the highest reporting group for identity theft, making up a full fifth of complaints across all age brackets.