barack-obama-2008

The State of the Union address was one of the most powerful speeches Obama has ever delivered. It seemed to remind all those watching of his powerful "Yes We Can" speech of 2008.
Just shy of a week after Obama took the oath of office, there's a new tome out by Bernard Goldberg that seeks to trash the supposedly liberal "mainstream media" for being in the tank for Obama.
They way I see it, the GOP has two paths it can take. One leads to a sustainable future, the other will land them somewhere between Neve Cambell's career and stacks of left over Cool Runnings VHS tapes.
The first order of business -- and one that cannot wait until inauguration -- must be halting the robbery-in-progress known as the "economic bailout."
Not since James Watt has there been a political figure so loved by the "right" -- and so reviled by the "left."
This photo does not appear anywhere in the linked story. It is only on the Drudge Report front page.
This is not the time for Democrats to play nice. And Biden is the perfect candidate to take on this challenge, a hardened politician who is willing to be as aggressive with the GOP as they have been with Democrats.
The fact still is that Senator McCain and his campaign lied to a pastor, by agreeing to rules and breaking them, and not telling him until after the fact.
One of Obama's most ardent supporters is Conor Oberst, the singer/songwriter best known for his band, Bright Eyes.
The "partial birth abortion" debate is an utterly pointless distraction, and Obama has completely played into the hands of the anti-choice organizations who want only to entrap him in political sport.
Can Obama win the white working-class voters in battleground states? Well, he didn't this spring, so that's our first clue. Another is the fact that neither Al Gore nor John Kerry won their support.
As a result of Obama's eclectic life experiences and upbringing, it is part of his nature to not only understand different people, but to make compromises to find solutions for the most complex issues.
Those of us who want real change must hold with one hand to the absolute necessity of an Obama victory and with the other to the possibility that pragmatic cynicism may be precisely not the road to achieve victory.
I'm starting to think that I'm a bad luck charm. In my almost ten years as a voting citizen, I think I've replaced the rabbit's foot on the key chains of Republicans across the country.
After days of near universal agreement that Obama's "bitter" comment was going to absolutely crush him, it turns out that most people in small towns don't care, and if anything, they kind of agree.