batman v superman dawn of justice

Recognizing the worst that Hollywood has to offer.
Both Batman and Superman are laughing all the way to the nearest Metropolis (or Gotham) bank. Even still, I offer a word of advice. If you go in aware that the film drags a bit more than it should and doesn't contain as many quips as a Joss Whedon adaptation would have, then you'll be better off.
The much anticipated 2016 film Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is now available for public consumption and most have found themselves with a bad case of indigestion.
It has been called dark, somber, convoluted, overstuffed, loud, fascist, nihilistic -- and the descriptions go on. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice has touches of all that, some more than others. But it's still worth the watch.
Director Zack Snyder accomplished what bullying, vegetables, and regular trips to the dentist failed to do; he ruined my childhood.
Jesse Eisenburg's Lex Luthor stole the show. His mumbly, stuttering, tic-filled demeanor gave us a look into the intricacy that is Luthor's sick mind. Eisenburg's ability to make you uncomfortable each time he fills the screen means he's doing his job and doing it well.
Maybe Zack Snyder could have learned a thing or two about comics if he'd read some instead of just flipping through and looking at the pretty pictures. Instead of watching Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, you'd do better to read the comics.
The plot of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is that Metropolis has been raised to the ground and Batman believes Superman
Panboys are equal opportunity haters. Think of them as a reflection of Congress, only instead of Republicans and Democrats, you've got Marvel-crats and DC-licans. (Or is it DC-ocrats and Marvel-icans? I get so confused.)