Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

As the Supreme Court nominee faced accusations of sexual assault, Chua wrote an op-ed defending him as "a mentor to women."
The Yale law professor and author offered advice to her daughter.
A few years ago, a controversial book entitled 'Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother' captured considerable media and public attention because it seemed to argue that overly-strict discipline borrowed from Chinese parenting philosophy was superior to the allegedly more casual Western parenting style. The book was actually less controversial -- and far less interesting -- than media coverage made it seem.
"I am really excited that this has been called Strive Meets Thrive, rather than Strive vs. Thrive, because I really profoundly
I'm not here to jump on that bandwagon. I'm here to address one crucial question that Amy Chua does not consider: the uneven starting point that immigrants face when they decide to come to the United States.
In describing how we can "build influence in a world of competing ideas," Butman suggests that we look for "iconic moments," even from childhood, where an insight grabbed hold of you and persists in your thoughts.
The urban mom is obsessed with making a science of parenting. This is healthy and completely normal. But here is where I draw the line: looking for solutions through cultural stereotyping and engaging in quasi-racist discourse under the guise of doing what's best for your child.
I'm no Tiger Mom. In actuality, I'm more of a Hamster Mom -- fond of delicious wedges of sleep and given to cuddling (and likely coddling) my brood in lieu of demanding perfection from them 24/7.
Last year's "Tiger Mom" tempest made Amy Chua a bestselling author, and Pamela Druckerman, author of the released-this-week Bringing Up Bébé, is surely hoping lightning strikes twice.
WATCH: "You've Got Amy Chua" Has Tiger Mom gone soft? One year after the release of her controversial memoir, "Battle Hymn
The desire for successful children in a performance-based culture often consumes us before we realize it.
Uncomfortable as it may be to explain adult topics to kids, I believe it's important to respect their intellectual capacity to seek and hold information they may only partially understand.
While my mother might loathe the term "Tiger Mother," as far as labels go, I like it. My husband and I started strategizing how to raise our kids -- by Chua's definition -- Chinese.
Is it possible that it is Amy Chua who has gotten it right? If parents don't let a little bit of their Tiger selves come out early, it's possible that Hymowitz's Cinderella model will reign supreme.
In the People's Republic, contemporary mothers, flooded with information that promote a more liberal model of modern parenting, are conflicted.
Why is being a mother so hard? And why do we all harbor such emotionally corrosive fears that we aren't doing it right?
If public school teachers in so many states are permitted to exist in a "do as I say, not as I do" world, what hope do we have of convincing our kids that violence or meanness won't be tolerated?
With branded luxury bags going stratospheric in Hong Kong, I wonder what will happen with brands that can't ride the wave
If you don't already know it, the cool kids are writing about Amy Chua, author of the parenting manual -- no, make that "memoir" -- Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother.