Bayard Rustin

Pacifist Bayard Rustin was behind the scenes of some of the biggest moments of the civil rights movement.
As I learned in the freedom movement as a young man (the "civil rights" movement) it's a mistake to make overly sharp contrasts between "democratic" and "undemocratic" communities, just as it's mistaken to contrast "good" and "bad" people. It's more or less, not either-or.
With the primary season now finally and officially underway, and with Senator Bernie Sanders' stunning victory in New Hampshire still registering on the political seismograph, I've been wondering what Bayard Rustin would make of it all.
This MLK holiday reminds me how Alabama has always been a troubling state when it comes to upholding the civil rights of its denizens.
If the political pundits would look around, they would even discover a significant number of prominent U.S. democratic socialists at work in a variety of fields. These and many other democratic socialists, among them Bernie Sanders, have played an important role in American life.
Bayard Rustin, the trailblazing organizer and activist, had four strikes against him. He was a pacifist, a radical, black and gay. Controversy surrounded him all his life.
As intersectionality becomes a more discussed realm within our current LGBT movement, we have no time to fantasize a reality in which white cis-dominance erases queer representation of color.
The scarring of war and poverty and racism that Malcolm X spoke of continues. It's time that students learn about the long history of activism that has challenged these deadly triplets.
The 2003 documentary “Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin” renewed interest in Rustin’s life. In 2013, President
The basic question answered in the documentary is "how have faith leaders, LGBT advocates and broader communities been able to find common ground and work together to advance the causes of social justice."
In celebration of Black History Month, I talked with Walter Naegle, who was pioneer civil rights activist Bayard Rustin's partner for the last decade of Rustin's life.
For the first time ever, an intergenerational and interracial gathering of LGBTQ voices of color and our allies came together, creating the paradigm of how future discussions should take place.
In fact, King was a radical. He believed that America needed a "radical redistribution of economic and political power." He challenged America's class system and its racial caste system.
I saw Selma, was not expecting a documentary, just a drama and am shocked people of my age seemingly know so little about this civil rights era. Nonetheless, here are 10 things I learned from screening Selma.
If Rustin was afraid or daunted, he never showed it. He kept living his life, standing up for anyone who needed a voice. He loved Black people, but as evidenced by his global activism, he loved all people.
Through daily moral consciousness we must all counter the proliferating voices of racial and ethnic and religious division that are regaining too much respectability over the land.
In September, "Derrick Adams: Live and in Color," opened at the Tilton Gallery in Manhattan. I sat down with Adams in Brooklyn, to talk about his work and career trajectory.
It's the immoral, flamboyant fossil fuel lifestyle that got us into this climate mess. Part of me wants to wash my hands of climate change and enjoy a little marriage equality while we all go to hell in a flaming hand basket.