beatlemania

Beatlemania was an important cultural phenomenon that changed the course of postwar history. Millions of baby boomers across a 15-year age range, across the globe, were smitten by four charismatic lads who, through their music, attitude, wit, and intelligence, excited us, dazzled us.
No fool, I headed toward Cousin Robby's building with Eddy in tow. At the canopied entrance of the building, a group of roughly
Beatles '65 was the grand finale of our first Beatle year. Next year's grand finale would be the paradigm-shifting Rubber Soul. EMI and Capitol continued the practice of putting out new music in time for holiday gift giving to this very day.
Looking back on this 50th anniversary of the Beatles arrival in America, music fans and cultural observers of all ages often ask, "Can anything like the Beatles happen again?" The question itself is somewhat rhetorical and acknowledges the singularity of the Beatles phenomenon.
If you thought last year was the year of pumpkin-spiced everything, well hold onto your forty-ounce pumpkin-spiced-cheesecake (so wrong) latte, because this year, Foodiness Inc.
The first song you write with someone is like a first kiss. The songs (or the kisses) that follow might be better for other reasons, or you might never want to write another song with that person again. Either way there's no song like the first song. There just isn't.
The following contains love sick drool along with reflection on the Beatlemania phenomenon being celebrated this year. It contains transcriptions written with poor spelling, fair grammar, and terrible punctuation, written first-hand by a teenager {me} in a Beatle diary.
Several myths about the band and the circumstances of the Fab Four's first American television, film and live performances persist
Unfortunately, we -- and by we, I speak now of my cohort, the Baby Boom generation -- seem to be the ones who have turned nostalgia into an industry. Which takes most of the fun out of it.
Fifty years ago, the Beatles came to America and told gaggles of screaming teenage girls, "I wanna hold your hand." But I first heard the song at my uncle's wedding in 1967.
I met a Beatle once. It was an after-soundcheck meet 'n' greet for one of his All Stars shows at Radio City Music Hall, 1992. There were about 35 of us, waiting in the dead-center of the orchestra seats at Radio City, about 5:30 in the afternoon.
"Hello, Dad," Paul said moments later, pumping my hand. But it wasn't my day -- it was Ella's.
Watch the full conversation on HuffPost Live. Katz was taken aback by the size of the eventual crowd. but she said the throng
On Feb. 9, 1964, the four shaggy haired men of The Beatles, donning matching, smart suits, took the stage of "The Ed Sullivan
Ricky is joined by Beatlemaniacs who recall their stories with the band.
A pairing of photographs of emotionally captivated women charts a course of events 50 years ago which can tell us something, today, about the power of the arts and the humanities to affect the quality of human life, and more, to ensure the survival of its spirit.
Freda Kelly, who ran the Beatles' fan club and was the secretary for their manager Brian Epstein, has refused to speak about or profit from her account of the eleven years she spent working for the Beatles. But with a desire for her grandson to know her story and her place in rock history, Freda is now ready to talk.
The answer: Alfred Hitchcock. We'll give you three guesses on who this bewigged superstar is. If you guessed Moe Howard, you've
BBC Four TV will also air a documentary about “Love Me Do,” a treat for fans looking to learn more about the single's history