behavioral economics

Other problems with fewer key variables have resisted this guessing approach and remain unsolved. If the problem were easy
However, there are many of us, as psychologist Ron Kivetz describes, who suffer from hyperopia, or "excessive farsightedness
An oft-cited example of a successful default rule is a 2007 Rutgers University experiment where changing the default printer
My sense is that these are just their narratives, the story they created to justify their decision. For some reason they
These programs, which are affiliated with VNSNY's Community Mental Health Services division, demonstrate that when it comes to building healthy communities and supporting the well-being of patients like Jean, physical and mental health can't be separated.
Guess who topped even Mother Teresa? The people who completed the survey, with a score of 87 percent. Apparently, most of the respondents thought they were better than Mother Teresa in regards to their likelihood of getting into heaven.
"The circumstances of one's birth have what seems to be a larger and larger role in determining one's economic well-being
For example, we have a rich understanding of the decision-making shortcuts that people apply, as well as of the predictable
Both of these incorrect beliefs are still pervasive. Because consumers lack perfect information about the product they are
There are many social norms that dictate gift-giving, including when, how and what to give as gifts. Interestingly, these norms don't seem to be about making sure that recipients get the gifts they want. What makes for a good or bad gift often differs in the eyes of givers and recipients.
Disney no longer markets movies; instead, they market fandoms. From Marvel to Pixar, and especially Star Wars, they create personal connections and pull hard on heartstrings.
Unless Germans begin viewing their hyphenated counterparts as viable future citizens, perspective-taking will be aggravated, fueling a vicious cycle of "othering."
Breakthroughs in scientific medical research have prompted AIDS activists and politicians to envision "an AIDS-free generation." UNAIDS has begun a countdown to zero: "no new HIV infections, no discrimination, and no new AIDS deaths."
There seems to be a mad rush in the media to analyze Black Friday. Yet, every analysis misses the point that Black Friday, which though on the surface seems like just vile consumerism, is actually, for some, quite a meaningful, ritualistic experience.
The ocean is indeed in deep, deep trouble due to overfishing, climate change, pollution, and habitat destruction, and good science is needed to turn that around. This science doesn't need to be fancy, expensive, or complicated. Rather, it needs to be thoughtful, targeted, and inclusive.
Governments should be obligated to disclose how behavioral science and technology are used in public policy.
"We broke up." "It's over." "No more." It can sound so easy. But the hard work sometimes begins right there. If you are done with listening to Sinead O'Connor and a good dose of mourning, and can suffer some humor again, and maybe a fresh outlook, then this article is for you.